The Jefferson Exchange

News & Information: Mon-Fri • 8am-10am | 8pm-10pm

JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and newsmakers from around the region and beyond. It airs on JPR's News & Information service. Choose that service from the stream above or find your station here.

Participate in the live program by calling 800-838-3760 or emailing JX@jeffnet.org

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College is expensive, and housing is tight in much of the country.  So it should not be much of a surprise to learn that some students are technically homeless while they go to college. 

A study released earlier this year showed that across the California State University system, more than 10% of students were at risk of homelessness at some point in the academic year, and another 41% experienced food insecurity. 

Jennifer Maguire at Humboldt State and Rashida Crutchfield at Long Beach State joined forces for the study.  They join us to lay out some of the facts. 

Rev Sysyphus, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5929199

Opponents of the proposed wall on the Mexican border often express their concerns in terms of people affected. 

But a wall that big would have an effect on the natural environment as well, and the Center for Biological Diversity has gone to court to make its case. 

CBD lists 93 endangered, threatened, and candidate species that could be adversely affected by the construction of the wall and patrols around it. 

michael clarke stuff, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24330893

Of all the fascinating creatures in the sea, one of the most important has neither fins nor tentacles nor eyeballs, and doesn't even move.  If you guessed seaweed, you guessed well. 

It's not really a weed, but a form of algae.  And it comes in thousands of varieties, many of them packed with nutrients good for many other creatures on the Earth. 

Seaweed harvesting is becoming a bigger business in Maine, and that's where Susan Hand Shetterly takes us in her book Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge

Ian Poellet, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=27045930

Medford is one of many cities dealing with rising numbers of people living on the streets.  And along with them come rising complaints about trash and a general decline in cleanliness downtown. 

Southern Oregon Digital Archive

Dr. Jim Shames has been a frequent guest of The Exchange, since he's Jackson County's chief medical officer.  But we did not realize what a backstory he has! 

Jim first arrived in Southern Oregon to deal with an outbreak of hepatitis at a commune in Takilma, in the Illinois Valley. 

TheDigitalArtist/Pixabay

When a country uses a bomb, the world knows.  When a country uses cyber warfare instead... well, our intelligence services say Russia did, and Vladimir Putin says it did not. 

That's one of the major differences in an age that allows warfare through computers.  It's no accident that security correspondent David E. Sanger calls his new book The Perfect Weapon

It's subtitled War, Sabotage and Fear in the Cyber Age.  No soldiers need apply; hackers step forward. 

BenjaminNelan/Pixabay

The concept of money you never touch is a little easier to understand in the age of debit cards. 

But Bitcoin?  Virtual wallets?  Cryptocurrencies?  It takes a little more work to wrap our minds around recent developments in concepts of money, especially the blockchain technology that makes cryptocurrencies possible. 

Fortunately, Stephen McKeon is well-versed on the subject matter.  He is an assistant professor in the Department of Finance at the University of Oregon. 

California Air National Guard

Thousands of people lost their homes when wildfires swept through California north of the Bay Area last year.  And many of those people got confusing and just plain bad information from insurance adjusters sent to help them get back on their feet. 

Attorney Jon Eisenberg, who lost a house in the Oakland fire of 1991 and nearly lost his Healdsburg home last year, helped some of last year's fire victims untangle the insurance/legal snarl. 

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Camas Davis was a magazine editor with a desire to simplify her life. 

So she left New York for a job in her native Oregon, only to watch her dreams come apart in short order. 

So what next?  That's the story she tells in her memoir Killing It: An Education, about taking up with a family of French pig farmers and butchers, learning a whole new trade and outlook on life. 

Life, death, and dinner have not been the same since. 

Rico Shen/Wikimedia

We once called people "tinkers" if they spent time putting things together from parts, or fixed up worn-out gadgets with improvised fixes. 

But the expression of the moment is "maker," and Ashland will be the site of the Rogue Valley Mini Maker Faire in late September.  The call for makers, crafters, speakers, and sure, tinkers is on. 

Maker Faire organizers want to get the list locked up by August 17th. 

http://www.tayoalukoandfriends.com

Tayo Aluko can't get enough of Paul Robeson.  The singer/actor/activist sang "Old Man River" like nobody else, and left his stamp on American politics as well. 

Tayo Aluko gets to slip into the skin of the great performer in the one-man play "Call Mr. Robeson," which Aluko brings back to Ashland August 12-15. 

Schyler at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=13465049

Major league sport seasons seem to go on and on.  The NBA puts in an 82-game regular season before two months of playoffs. 

But that's only half the length of the major league baseball season, which tops all major sports at 162 games plus playoffs. 

The players are well-paid, but that's a lot of running, swinging, throwing, bending, and stretching. 

Washington Post baseball writer Barry Svrluga followed his local team through a season in his book The Grind: Inside Baseball's Endless Season

Geoffrey Riley/JPR News

"Bad" and "awful" are common descriptors for the recent air quality in much of the region. 

Wildfire smoke has pushed the quality into official ranges from Moderate at best to Hazardous at worst. 

We've established in previous interviews that breathing the smoky air is  not quite like smoking cigarettes, but it does have its potential hazards. 

Jackson County Health and Human Services keeps the county up on smoke issues. 

Shasta County Sheriff's Office

The view from Redding on that Thursday night was terrifying. 

A thick curtain of smoke got between the city and the setting sun, and flames seemed to leap from ground to sky.  Scientists have confirmed that there really was a "firenado" as the Carr Fire brought its destruction into town. 

Daniel Swain at the Center for Climate Science at UCLA has been looking at the data.  Ryan Sandler at the National Weather Service in Medford knows how things usually work in the atmosphere.

Anthony Crider, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=61769434

People have always harassed other people in the United States for being different. 

But the numbers of incidents seemed to climb after Donald Trump won the presidency in 2016. 

Activist Arjun Singh Sethi, himself the target of hate speech and actions, collects stories from people who've been harassed and worse in the book American Hate

StockSnap/Pixabay

Smart meters are being installed in place of the old analog "wheel" meters in the region by Pacific Power.  But not without a fight, in some cases. 

There's a particularly sharp reaction to the meters and their wireless communication features, plus concerns about possible incendiary properties. 

We sought out a medical expert who knows something about Wi-Fi and whether it has carcinogenic properties.  Dr. Steven Seung is a radiation oncologist with Providence Cancer Institute in Portland. 

wikipedia commons

People growing marijuana illegally in the forest don't care much who owns the forest. 

So while you hear plenty about illegal grows on federal Forest Service land, there have been many on tribal land in Northern California, too.  Have been, past tense, says the Yurok tribe. 

The tribe recently paused Operation Yurok, which focused on removing all large-scale pot grows on Yurok land. 

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The Great Depression lasted a dozen years in the United States, and was only replaced by World War II.  The Great Recession of 2008 ended a lot sooner.  Didn't it? 

Historian Adam Tooze takes a long, hard look at the more recent financial crisis and its causes, and even questions whether it's fully over. 

He also traces a number of world events--the rise of China, Brexit, and the election of Donald Trump--to the recession and its aftermath.  Tooze's book is Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World

Maybe you're pining for fall already, and a break from heat and smoke. 

But we've got long, warm days and maybe even a little time off from work.  That's the reason summer is so conducive to a little extra reading.  Or a lot, if we're lucky. 

Our Summer Reads segment is back for a second summer, visiting with local and locally-owned bookstores to get ideas for good summertime reads. 

Oregon Books and Games and The Rogue Reader, twin stores in Grants Pass, are the latest independent book stores to check in with some items for your reading consideration. 

inderwadhwa, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30365014

Now the whole country knows there is a Redding, California.  Which would be a good thing, if it weren't for the catastrophic fire that brought all the attention. 

The people working to bring visitors and businesses to the region have some work ahead of them, especially since there will almost assuredly be an economic hit from the devastation of the Carr Fire. 

The Redding Chamber is assessing the impacts, along with the Visit Redding people, who work closely with the Shasta-Cascade Wonderland Association

Jake Mangas runs the Chamber; Ed Rullman sits on the boards of Visit Redding and Shasta-Cascade, Bob Nash runs Superior California Economic Development

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