media

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Memorial Day is the first holiday that gives the Exchange staff a breather; we stock today's show with items from past shows.  

At 8: Eugene's Peter Fenton wrote about his training in conning people at summer carnivals.  His book is called Eyeing The Flash

At 9: the rich flora of the region and how the original residents used it is collected in Patricia Whereat Phillips' book Ethnobotany of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians

Michael Clapp/OPB

The fire or hurricane or mass shooting can be many miles away, but events like those can affect children anywhere.  And recent research shows that school teachers should be ready to discuss disasters with their students. 

Our media-rich world makes it easy for children to keep up on disasters, but the coverage can scare kids and even affect their mental health. 

Brian Houston directs the Disaster and Community Crisis Center at the University of Missouri. 

Christmas Specials

Dec 24, 2018
Wikimedia

The Exchange crew is off Christmas Day, offering you these replacements instead of our usual fare:
At 8: Earth Is Our Home: Living on Earth's annual holiday show is back! The program features and stories from three performers about living on Earth, sharing the planet and universal themes of the season.

The roster includes storyteller Jay O'Callahan, singer Denny Breau, and green hip-hop artist Tem Blessed. They sing, rap, and talk the need for love, good food, kindness toward all creatures and the value of imagination.

Non-stop Media: Signals & Noise

Sep 12, 2018

Bob Woodward, of Nixon-era fame, publishes a tell-all about President Donald Trump in his new book. The New York Times publishes its own tell-all in an op-ed written by an anonymous source working near the president. And Nike features an ad with Colin Kaepernick's face overlaid with text that reads: "Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything.”

Sounds like another exciting month in the media business, up for discussion in our media segment, Signals & Noise. 

Our guests, Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi, teach young people about the media at Southern Oregon University

Indian Country Today went dormant for a while. 

The online source of news about Native Americans and by Native Americans had to figure out a way to become and stay financially viable, like many a news organization in the 2010s. 

ICT got back in the game earlier this year with the naming of a new editor and associate editor. 

niekverlaan/Pixabay

Just about anybody who ever worked in a newsroom can share a story about a public official NOT looking happy to see a reporter. 

News organizations report on the business of government, not always a comfortable situation for people in government. 

And a recent study shows that cities where newspapers shut down saw an increase in local government costs, at least partly because of reduced scrutiny of city deals. 

geralt/Pixabay

Is advertising an art or a science?  The case can be made for either or both. 

Marketing has made huge strides in developing consumer behavior, and creating "needs" where there previously weren't even desires. 

Now the business itself has been turned on its head by the Internet and adbots and algorithms.  Ken Auletta, long a writer on the media in books and in the New Yorker, looks at the fate of advertising in our time in Frenemies: The Epic Disruption of the Ad Business (and Everything Else)

Pixabay

Following the news closely is stressful. Something traumatic seems to happen every day; if not at home, then abroad.

Can we adjust our news diets to stay both informed and, well, sane?

Longtime journalist Peter Laufer, of Eugene, authored Slow News: A Manifesto for the Critical News Consumer in 2014.

We are not kidding when we say the media landscape changes at lightning speed in today's world. 

Who would have thought major news organizations would quote the purported comments of the president and say "s**thole" on the air?  But it happened, just hours after the last Signals & Noise segment. 

That's our monthly conclave with members of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University

Harland Quarrington/Wikimedia Commons

It can be truly difficult to keep up with the ever-changing media landscape.  Even for us, and we're PART of the media. 

Just consider the recent news items about media (and political) figures accused of sexual misconduct. 

Or the effort to end net neutrality through federal regulatory action. 

There's always something new to digest and discuss in Signals & Noise, our monthly conclave with members of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

News from around the world in an instant.  New movies for fall.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

News from around the world in an instant.  Summer movies.  Social media. 

The Internet alone gives us an almost unlimited supply of media options. 

And it gives us plenty to talk about with Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi of the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

They join us once a month to talk about media topics--news and not--in a segment we call "Signals & Noise." 

Gage Skidmore, CC BY-SA 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=56560359

"Facts are facts."  "You can argue about the meaning, but not about the facts."  Insert your favorite phrase on facts and reality here. 

Telling the truth seems to be taking a beating in today's world. 

Brooke Gladstone gets to watch the process in her role as co-host of "On The Media," heard on JPR. 

She gives us some off-air thoughts in her small book The Trouble With Reality: A Rumination on Moral Panic in Our Time

Arturo Pardavila III, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49782715

One giant TV chain wants to buy another giant TV chain. 

Stephen Colbert's presidential insults draw the attention of the FCC chair. 

Social media "influencers" played a role in the recent Fyre Festival fiasco. 

Yep, always SOMETHING to talk about in the media, and we gather up some highlights for our monthly chat "Signals & Noise" with Southern Oregon University Communications faculty Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay. 

All you need is a phone that reaches the Internet.  And with that in your hand, your media options are limitless.  In this media age, it can be hard to separate the signals from the noise. 

Which is why we take time each month for a media perusal, called "Signals & Noise," with members of the communications faculty at Southern Oregon University. 

This month we visit with Andrew Gay and Christopher Lucas about Pulitzer Prize winners, crowdfunding for documentary films, and other issues on the media horizon. 

Bidgee, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7437952

There's never a dull moment in media lately.  President Trump has gone from talking about "fake news" to declaring members of the news media "enemies of the people." 

And on the lighter side, who handed Warren Beatty that wrong envelope at the Oscars? 

We track the changes in the world of information in a segment called Signals & Noise.  Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University. 

Information Today: Signals & Noise

Feb 8, 2017
Stefan Kühn, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=105738

It's a weird time in the history of information.  On one hand, the Internet makes so much information available so quickly, it's easy to stay informed. 

On the other hand, people fight about facts and truth far more than they used to, and the president himself even referred to a news organization as "fake news" shortly before he took office. 

We track the changes in the world of information in a new segment called Signals & Noise, starting today. 

Our partners: the Communications department at Southern Oregon University. 

Media Literacy In An Age Of Media Profusion

Nov 30, 2016
Wikimedia

The election season of 2016 served up surprises by the truckload. 

One of them was the realization that mass media is not so mass anymore... each of us has our own choices in media, and the choices often give plenty of opinion with facts. 

Which brings up another point: how do you KNOW when you're getting facts?  Bogus news stories on pop-up media gained traction in an already fragmented media world. 

These are issues that come up in the teaching of Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi at Southern Oregon University, where Ebbi "Mohammad" Zamani is a student. 

The Bumpy Early History Of Broadcasting

Jun 10, 2016
HarperCollins

It's one of the sadder stories in broadcasting history: the first FM radios were rendered completely useless when the federal government MOVED the entire FM band to a different range of frequencies. 

First and most obvious question: why?  The surprising answer and the personalities involved are revealed in Scott Woolley's book The Network

Money, power, egos... all figured in the development of the industry we know and love. 

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