Squeaky Wheel

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

It wasn't so long ago that a car reaching 100,000 miles traveled was a big deal.  Back then, odometers generally didn't even count above 99,999.  Now they do, and the vehicles that contain them survive and even thrive in middle age. 

But... but they still break down, and Zach Edwards and his staff of technicians at Ashland Automotive work to find out why.  Zach visits once a month in a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel, taking questions on vehicle care and repair. 

Call 800-838-3760 with your car questions, or send them to JX@jeffnet.org

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Ah, the open road.  The weather's good, the highway is clear, the wind is in our hair... and what's that sound? 

Motor vehicles may be more reliable generally than a generation ago, but parts still wear out and vehicles stop working correctly.  Zach Edwards and his team at Ashland Automotive make a living correcting things that go wrong under our hoods. 

Zach visits once a month for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel, to take your questions on car care and feeding, and otherwise talk shop.  Join in by phone at 800-838-3760 or by email at JX@jeffnet.org. 

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These are the days of the year when you're mostly likely to get into your car and speed off to a vacation spot, with the air conditioner keeping you cool on the way. 

How's your car holding up under the pressure?  Anything rattling where it didn't before? 

Zach Edwards has heard many a telltale rattle in his years repairing cars.  Now he heads a team of car-repair technicians at Ashland Automotive.  And he joins us once a month for a perusal of car-care issues we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

MatanVizel/Pixabay

It's still the American dream for many people: hop into the car, strap in, fire up, and take off.  That assumes that the car cooperates, starts up and runs well. 

When it doesn't, well, that's the domain of Zach Edwards, the owner of Ashland Automotive.  Once a month he visits for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel: car repair and operation tips and tricks. 

We invite the audience to chime in with stories and questions at 800-838-3760 and JX@jeffnet.org.  This month, how to help a mechanic diagnose what's wrong with your car or truck. 

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Anyone who remembers the cars of a few decades ago can appreciate just how much more comfortable motor vehicles are these days.  But comfort does not preclude the occasional performance issue. 

Sometimes our cars and trucks just act weirdly (or don't act at all), and we have to get them fixed.  Zach Edwards thanks those people and vehicles for his livelihood at Ashland Automotive

Once a month, Zach visits to answer questions about car care and feeding, in a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

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Your car survived the winter... the engine starts up okay, the studded tires are off, and smooth driving lies ahead.  Or does it? 

Anything you might have deferred in vehicle maintenance in the last few months?  It might come back to haunt you, when something clanks when it should be humming. 

Zach Edwards is used to the noises vehicles make; he owns Ashland Automotive.  And he joins us once a month for a vehicle visit called The Squeaky Wheel.  Join in with your car care questions: 800-838-3760 or JX@jeffnet.org

Public Domain/Wikimedia

Was that rattle there before?  A common question for a vehicle owner, one that may lead to a repair job.  Our vehicles are nicer to us than ever; they tell repair technicians, through computer codes, what's wrong with them. 

But they don't quite fix themselves, and that's where Zach Edwards and mechanics like him come in.  Zach owns Ashland Automotive and visits once a month for a car-care segment we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

We invite you to call and email with stories of car mishaps and fixups. 

jaygeorge/Pixabay

The reliability of modern cars is impressive.  When was the last time your car wouldn't start, and someone told you "you flooded it?"  Onboard computers and fuel injection and other improvements have added much to the driving experience. 

But cars and trucks still break down, or act like they're about to.  That's where Zach Edwards' relationship with a vehicle begins.  He's fixed cars for many years, now runs Ashland Automotive, and joins us once a month for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

Got a car issue bedeviling you?  Call and ask Zach about it, at 800-838-3760, or email JX@jeffnet.org

WikiImages/Pixabay

They go farther on each gallon of gas, they pollute less, and they run quieter.  The vehicles of today are very different from the cars and trucks of a generation ago. 

The computer systems in modern vehicles constantly adjust them for optimum performance.  But cars can and do still break down. 

That's where Zach Edwards and the technicians of Ashland Automotive come in.  Zach shares his voluminous knowledge of vehicles with us every month in a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

Geoffrey Riley/JPR

Forget self-driving cars.  Many of us have been waiting for self-repairing cars. 

That may take a while longer... and during the wait, Zach Edwards and his team at Ashland Automotive will stay busy.  Once a month, Zach joins us to talk about car issues in a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

This month we focus on car issues typical for the middle of winter.

WikiImages/Pixabay

What's the weirdest sound you ever heard coming from a car or truck?  Those are seldom welcome sounds, because they usually indicate something wrong, or about to go wrong, with the vehicle. 

Zach Edwards has heard plenty of them over the years in his work repairing cars; he now own Ashland Automotive.  And he visits once a month to talk about cars and their... um, issues. 

Falkenpost/Pixabay

Self-driving cars may be a while off, but our vehicles already seem to have minds of their own.  In a sense, they do: computers control or at least monitor many of the functions of our vehicles' engines and other systems. 

Zach Edwards, the owner of Ashland Automotive, remembers what it was like to work on cars in the pre-computer age.  He's also kept up with the times in how to repair cars now that they can tell technicians what needs fixing. 

Zach joins us once a month for a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel. 

Irvin calicut, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16024219

Thinking about towing that heavy trailer from the back of your Prius? Maybe think twice about it.

Once a month, Zach Edwards of Ashland Automotive visits to answer our questions and yours about mysteries under the hood.

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One of the better features of modern cars is that they can tell you what's wrong with them.  Not in words, but with computer codes. 

The advent of computer diagnostics makes it a whole lot easier to figure out what ails a car.  But somebody's still got to fix it, and that's Zach Edwards' business at Ashland Automotive

Once a month he visits to answer our questions and yours about mysteries under the hood.  We call the segment The Squeaky Wheel, and invite you to call or write and be that wheel. 

Mészáros Zoltán, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49966768

When you think about all the processes that go on in our cars and trucks, it's something of a miracle that they work as well as they do.  There's a lot that can go wrong. 

And Zach Edwards makes a living from setting those things right again.  Zach is the owner of Ashland Automotive and a monthly visitor to The Exchange for our car-care segment, The Squeaky Wheel. 

What's squeaking or chattering or rubbing or grinding on your vehicle?

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Run a car engine with the muffler off, and you realize the violence going on in there. 

An internal combustion engine features a lot of--wait for it--combustion.  There are many explosions (okay, controlled burns) every second.  And those make heat that the cooling system has to carry away. 

So what goes on in the radiator and tubing, and what can (and does) go wrong?  Ashland Automotive owner Zach Edwards joins us for another edition of The Squeaky Wheel. 

thgmueller/Pixabay

The "vroom vroom" comes from the engine, but a car or truck goes nowhere without a functioning transmission. 

Whether you shift the gears yourself or a vacuum does the work for you in an automatic, the transmission is a critical part of the car. 

Just look at the name: it "transmits" power from the engine to the wheels.  So what goes on in there, and what can (and does) go wrong? 

Ashland Automotive owner Zach Edwards joins us for another edition of The Squeaky Wheel. 

Irvin calicut, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16024219

It's one of the worst sounds you can hear coming from under your vehicle... that grinding sound when you step on the brakes, indicating something has worn out and needs to be replaced.  But which something? 

That's among the questions we have for Zach Edwards, the owner of Ashland Automotive, as he returns for another edition of The Squeaky Wheel, our monthly visit on car care and feeding. 

But we won't limit the discussion to how the car stops. 

cars cars cars Florida, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=38128730

The engine's fine, the tires are good, the brakes work... but still, there's SOMETHING making noise underneath your favorite motor vehicle. 

Is there something amiss with the suspension?  Something out of whack in the steering mechanism? 

These are the parts of the car we focus on in this month's installment of The Squeaky Wheel, with Ashland Automotive owner Zach Edwards. 

JosepMonter/Pixabay

We do love our motor vehicles in America.  And in a region like ours, far-flung and thinly populated, we often can't live without 'em. 

So it's plenty stressful when our cars and trucks begin to act up or act strangely. 

Zach Edwards has seen plenty of strange vehicle behavior in his years working on cars and owning Ashland Automotive

He visits once a month to take listeners calls and emails on automotive issues, in a segment we call The Squeaky Wheel.  This month, we focus on the differences between four-wheel drive and all-wheel drive. 

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