Oppressed By Wildfire

Jefferson Public Radio spent months speaking to families about how wildfires impact them. We found that wildfires leave the most long-lasting impacts on minority populations — as well as seniors and people with disabilities — due, in part, to systems not designed with them in mind.

This four-part radio series was produced in pertnership with the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2019 California Fellowship.

April Ehrlich | JPR News

Wildfire isn’t always a bad thing. In fact, fire has been an integral part of Native American culture for centuries as a tool to keep forests healthy.


April Ehrlich | JPR News

When a major wildfire burns into an urban area, federal disaster officials are quick to offer financial help to people who lose their homes. But not everyone is eligible for aid after a wildfire.

In fact, if you don’t have a home address, there’s a good chance you can’t even get into a shelter.


April Ehrlich | JPR News

Some people say they only had minutes to prepare before they had to flee their homes during the Carr Fire in Shasta County last year. Such short notice was extra challenging for seniors and people with disabilities.


April Ehrlich | JPR News

Abandoning your home while fleeing a wildfire can be a traumatic experience. It’s even scarier if you don’t understand the language of the evacuation alerts chiming into your phone.