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As Governors Contemplate Reopening, Here's What Restrictions Look Like In Each State

A lone pedestrian crosses an otherwise empty Main Street in downtown Kansas City, Mo., on April 14 as stay-at-home orders continue in much of the country in an effort to stem the spread of the new coronavirus.
A lone pedestrian crosses an otherwise empty Main Street in downtown Kansas City, Mo., on April 14 as stay-at-home orders continue in much of the country in an effort to stem the spread of the new coronavirus.

As confirmed cases of the virus surge, state leaders are trying to slow its spread with sweeping measures. They vary state to state, and some are starting to make plans to open up again.

Updated April 14 at 5:00 p.m. ET

Just as the coronavirus has spread from coast to coast and disrupted nearly every aspect of daily life, so too have the state-level restrictions and recommendations designed to combat it.

Governors are implementing all sorts of measures aimed at controlling the outbreak and responding to the public health and economic damage it has already caused.

Most have enacted stay-at-home orders, but policies vary from state to state when it comes to issues like school closures, election proceedings, interstate travel, business restrictions, resources for front line and unemployed personnel, and more.

Each day brings changes. NPR is tracking developments in all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia so you can see what's changed and how states compare. To stay on top of the latest updates, scroll down or click on the state's name from the list below.

Here's what each one has done so far.

Alabama

  • Gov. Kay Ivey issued a statewide stay-at-home order effective April 4 through April 30. It orders people to stay in their place of residence except for performing specific essential activities. Nonessential businesses are closed, and those still operating on-site are required to implement social distancing measures.
  • All non-work related gatherings that are larger than 10 people, or gatherings of any size that cannot maintain a consistent six-foot distance between people, are prohibited.
  • Anyone who tests positive for COVID-19 must quarantine in their place of residence for 14 days.
  • Alabama's beaches are closed, while restaurants and bars are open for takeout or delivery only.
  • Elective dental and medical procedures are delayed.
  • All Alabama public schools are closed through the end of the academic year. Ivey has ordered that all public K-12 schools complete the year "using alternate methods of instruction."
  • Ivey says local authorities can allow law enforcement officers to issue a summons instead of making an arrest for misdemeanors, with some exceptions, to reduce movement in and out of jails. Local officials are allowed to reduce the number of local inmates being held in county jails in a way that does not jeopardize public safety.
  • On April 3, Ivey granted temporary relief from residential evictions and foreclosures for the duration of the public health emergency. The proclamation saves people from being thrown out of their homes but doesn't relieve them of the need to pay their rent and mortgage.
  • Ivey announced the launch of , a centralized guide to the state's coronavirus relief efforts.
  • Ivey issued a State of Emergency for severe weather on April 12, which temporarily suspended any provision of the COVID-19 orders "to the extent that its application or enforcement would endanger any person affected" by the weather conditions.
  • A supplemental emergency proclamation issued April 13 allows the Board of Pardons and Paroles to resume parole hearings in a "manner that reduces person-to-person interaction."
  • Alaska

  • Gov. Mike Dunleavy ordered Alaskans to shelter at home and close all nonessential businesses. People and businesses operating on-site must practice social distancing.The order took effect March 28 and will be reevaluated by April 21.
  • People or organizations that violate the order may be criminally prosecuted for reckless endangerment, a class A misdemeanor.
  • Travel within the state has been banned except in cases where it is "to support critical infrastructure or is for critical personal needs." This mandate has been extended through April 21.
  • The governor ordered that restaurants and bars be open for pickup or delivery only,and practice social distancing on the premises.
  • Entertainment facilities, libraries, and museums are closed to the public indefinitely.
  • Anyone arriving in Alaska has been ordered to self-quarantine for 14 days and fill out a "mandatory Travel Declaration Form."
  • State authorities prohibited gatherings of more than 10 people and required that businesses and gatherings shut down if individuals were within six feet of each other.
  • Public and private schools are closed through the end of the academic year. Distance learning will continue, and the State of Alaska Incident Command will decide in April whether it is safe for small groups of students to meet with their teachers for final conferences in person.
  • All elective medical procedures must be postponed until after June 15 to allow health care providers to prioritize urgent and emergency visits. Elective oral health procedures must also be postponed.
  • The state will use non-congregate shelter options like hotels and dormitories to establish a temporary quarantine and isolation program for first responders, health care workers and homeless individuals or families with a confirmed positive case.
  • Arizona

  • Gov. Doug Ducey enacted a stay-at-home order on March 31. The order directs Arizonans to limit their time away from their place of residence, with exceptions for performing and utilizing essential activities and services. Individuals must maintain six feet of distance from others when out in public. The order remains in effect through April 30.
  • The stay-at-home order mandates that only businesses deemed essential can operate on-site, and those that remain open must implement physical distancing measures.
  • Ducey halted all elective surgeries in the state.
  • The governor signed an executive order allowing pharmacists "to utilize their professional judgement" in filling medication refills for up to 90 days. For filling COVID-19 prescriptions of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, the prescription "must be presented with a diagnosis code for COVID-19 from the prescriber."
  • The governor announced $5 million in funding for people having trouble paying rent because of the outbreak.
  • The state received $9.8 million in funding for the Emergency Food Assistance Program, which provides emergency food and nutrition assistance to low-income individuals.
  • Public schools are now closed through the end of the academic year.
  • An executive order signed on March 24 delays the enforcement of eviction action orders for renters for 120 days.
  • Following new guidance on nonessential services, barbershops, tanning salons, tattoo parlors, spas, massage therapist services, and cosmetology, hair and nail salons closed beginning April 4. Amenities at public parks that do not allow for proper hygiene or social distancing, like basketball courts and playgrounds, are also closed, though the parks themselves remain open.
  • An April 6 executive order halts evictions through May 31 for small businesses and nonprofits that are unable to pay rent because of financial hardship caused by the coronavirus.
  • Anyone traveling to Arizona through any airport in the state "from an area with substantial community spread," including but not limited to the New York Tri-State area, must self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Ducey signed an executive order providing civil liability protections to health care workers.
  • Arkansas

  • Gov. Asa Hutchinson has resisted calls to issue a statewide stay-home order as other states have done. He told NPR on April 6 that he did not plan to issue such an order, but said "if we need to do more, we will."
  • The Arkansas secretary of health is prohibiting gatherings of more than 10 people "in any confined indoor or outdoor space."
  • Hutchinson has issued an executive order to "fully leverage telehealth" in the state, and loosened regulations to help patients access therapists over the phone.
  • Hutchinson extended the mandatory closure of all public schools through the remainder of the 2019-2020 academic year. Teachers will continue to provide "alternative methods of instruction" for students, and schools may continue child nutrition services through meal pickup and delivery.
  • The Arkansas Department of Health recommends a self-quarantine for people arriving in the state from New York and all international locations.
  • Occupancy of commercial lodgings and short-term rentals like hotels, motels and vacation rentals is limited to "authorized guests" as directed by the Secretary of Health. Approved guests include health care professionals, first responders, law enforcement, journalists, airline crew members, hospital patients and their families, and people in need of shelter due to domestic violence and homelessness.
  • Bars, clubs and restaurants offer takeout and delivery only, and nonessential businesses including gyms, indoor entertainment venues, and spas are closed.
  • On April 9, state lawmakers rejected a proposal that would have allowed voters to cast absentee ballots without an excuse in the November general election. Hutchinson had previously waived that requirement only for the state's primary runoff in March.
  • Health facilities must postpone all elective, routine and non-urgent visits and procedures.
  • California

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom issued an order mandating that individuals must stay home, except for activity "needed to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors, critical government services, schools, childcare, and construction." Essential services such as grocery stores and pharmacies will remain open. The order took effect March 19 and will last "until further notice."
  • Newsom signed an executive order March 30 ordering a 90-day extension for small businesses for tax returns and tax payments. The order also extends the statute of limitations to file a claim for a tax refund by 60 days.
  • Nonessential medical care and elective procedures must be rescheduled.
  • With some exceptions, people are not allowed to visit family members in hospitals or nursing homes.
  • Newsom says that financial institutions will offer a 90-day grace period for mortgage payments to people economically impacted by the outbreak.The governor also banned all evictions through May 31.
  • Health officials issued guidelines saying it is "preferable" for individuals to wear face masks or cloth face coverings when "going into an environment where physical distancing is all but impossible," including grocery stores.
  • Newsom signed an executive order expanding access to child care for essential workers.
  • California is working to expand its hospital capacity to accommodate COVID-19 patients.Newsom said on April 6 that the state is setting up federal medical stations and alternate care facilities to care for less sick patients. It has also leased and reopened two recently shuttered hospitals and received a naval medical ship from the federal government to use as surge facilities.
  • Newsom said on April 1 that families and educations should operate "with the expectation now that schools will not reopen, but classes are in" for the rest of the academic year.
  • State emergency legislation released $100 million to support child care services for essential workers and vulnerable populations.
  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington announced the Western States Pact on April 13. The framework offers principles and goals for a shared approach to reopening states' economies.
  • California is investing $42 million over three months into programs aimed at supporting foster youth, keeping families together and reducing child abuse.
  • Colorado

  • Gov. Jared Polis issued a stay-at-home order effective March 26, which has been extended through April 26. The order directs Coloradans to stay home, except for performing certain essential activities and jobs.
  • The governor prolonged the suspension of in-person learning at all statewide K-12 schools until April 30.
  • All businesses not defined as "critical businesses" must close and social gatherings are prohibited.According to the state's Department of Public Health & Environment, "critical businesses" include restaurants (for takeout and delivery only), marijuana dispensaries, pharmacies, liquor stores and gun shops.
  • People are required to stay at least 6 feet from others in public.
  • On March 29, the federal government approved Polis' request to declare a Major Disaster, making the state eligible for federal disaster funding and FEMA assistance.
  • Polis issued a one-month extension for filing and remitting state and state-administered local sales tax, moving the deadline to May 20. Deadlines for state severance taxes have been moved to May 15.
  • An April 7 executive order extends limits on evictions, foreclosures, and public utility disconnections through April 30. It also expedites unemployment insurance claims processing.
  • Polis also extended executive orders on the temporary suspension of elective medical procedures, the closure of ski areas, and the issuance of marriage licenses with government offices closed.
  • Polis encouraged faith leaders to offer online or drive-in services for religious holidays, and issued guidelines for places of worship.
  • An April 11 executive order suspends certain regulatory statutes related to juvenile justice, regional centers and behavioral health for 30 days.
  • Coloradans are directed to wear face masks in public, in line with CDC guidance.
  • Connecticut

  • Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order directing Connecticut residents to "Stay Safe, Stay at Home" beginning March 23. The order mandates the closure of all nonessential business and not-for-profit entities, prohibits public community gatherings "of any size for any reason," directs people to maintain six feet of distance from others whenever possible, and instructs essential businesses to implement social distancing measures. On April 10, Lamont extended all closures, distancing and safety measures through May 20.
  • An April 7 executive order implements an additional set of protective measures, called "Safe Workplace Rules," for essential businesses.
  • Lamont issued an executive order allowing restaurants, wineries, breweries and bars to deliver directly to homes. State statutes have been modified to suspend the delivery signature requirement.
  • Lamont says the state's small businesses and nonprofits impacted by the virus may apply for "one-year, no-interest loans of up to $75,000."
  • Public schools remain closed through at least May 20.
  • The state's 2020 presidential primary election has been rescheduled to June 2.
  • The State of Connecticut Judicial Branch announced on April 3 that beginning April 14, all courthouses will be closed on Tuesdays and Thursdays "until further notice."
  • Lamont issued an executive order on April 7 permitting recent graduates of medical school and "other medical profession graduates" who are not yet licensed to begin practicing. It also permits practice before licensure for mental health counselor associates and marital and family therapy associates.
  • An April 10 executive order issues protections for residential renters impacted by the pandemic for the duration of the public health emergency.
  • The governors of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Delaware announced on April 13 the creation of a multi-state council that will develop a regional framework for safely and gradually lifting stay-at-home orders and restoring the economy.
  • Delaware

  • Gov. John Carney ordered people in his state to stay at home when possible, from March 24 through May 15 or "until the public health threat is eliminated." Carney also ordered nonessential businesses in Delaware to close.
  • A modified emergency order limits public gatherings to no more than 10 people through May 15, and requires essential businesses to enforce specific social distancing measures.
  • Schools have been ordered to remain closed through at least May 15.
  • Effective April 6, the only child care facilities remaining open are those designated as "Emergency Childcare Sites," which serve just the children of essential personnel.
  • The governor issued an order on March 29 requiring anyone who enters the state and "is not merely passing through" to self-quarantine for 14 days or for the duration of the individual's stay in the state, whichever period is shorter. Exceptions will be made for public safety, public health or health care personnel.
  • Upstate trout fishing season opened early, on March 31, to "help minimize crowds and accommodate outdoor recreation."
  • A modification to the state emergency declaration rescheduled Delaware's presidential primary to June 2, and suspended residential foreclosures and evictions.
  • Another modification to the emergency declaration, effective April 7 at 8:00 p.m., banned all short-term rental units and closed commercial lodging with some exceptions through May 15. It also banned door-to-door solicitation and closed pawn shops, video game stores, and other electronics retailers.
  • State public health officials are advising Delawareans to wear cloth face coverings in public settings, in line with CDC guidance.
  • The state is urging citizens with health care and child care experience to join its emergency workforce.Carney had previously asked all individuals, businesses and nonprofits to donate critical supplies to the state's coronavirus response effort, and announced a formal request-for-assistance to private sector vendors.
  • The governors of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Delaware announced on April 13 the creation of a multi-state council that will develop a regional framework for safely and gradually lifting stay-at-home orders and restoring the economy.
  • District of Columbia

  • Mayor Muriel Bowser issued a district-wide stay-at-home order effective April 1, with exceptions forperforming essential activities like grocery shopping and obtaining medical care. Anyone who willfully violates the order may be found guilty of a misdemeanor, punishable by fine or imprisonment.
  • The mayor ordered all nonessential businesses closed and prohibited gatherings of more than 10 people through April 24.
  • Officials in the District Of Columbia announced there will be just 20 in-person voting sites for the June 2 presidential primary and urged voters to cast their ballots by mail.
  • D.C. Public Schools are closed through April 24 and students have moved to distance learning. Schools continue to provide meals to students.
  • D.C. Public Schools are distributing devices and hot spots for K-12 students whose families do not have them at home, to facilitate access to online resources and support remote learning.
  • Restaurants remain open for takeout and delivery only.
  • The D.C. Council passed a relief bill on April 7. The bill freezes rent across the district, requires mortgage companies to offer payment deferrals of up to 90 days, expands protections against utility shutoffs to include cable and telecommunications service, and prohibits debt-collection lawsuits and property seizures. It also expands the definition of unemployment to include self-employment, gig workers, and "others who otherwise would not qualify," expanding access to unemployment insurance.
  • Bowser issued an order on April 8 requiring farmers' markets to obtain specific waivers in order to operate.It also applies safety and social distancing protocols to other retail food sellers, and removes tennis and golf from the list of allowable recreational activities.
  • Shoppers must wear masks inside D.C grocery stores.
  • Bowser granted extra days of good time credits to 36 residents being held in the DC Jail on April 10, making approximately half of them eligible for immediate release.
  • Roads in Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park and Fort Dupont Park will be closed to vehicle traffic through April 30 to better accommodate pedestrians performing "essential exercise."
  • Bowser announced the launch of 10 weekday grocery distribution sites at D.C. schools, as well as a COVID-19 Needs Hotline and Web Portal that self-quarantining residents can use to request essential deliveries.
  • Florida

  • Gov. Ron DeSantis issued a stay-at-home order effective April 3, directing state residents to remain indoors and limit movement to obtaining "essential services" or conducting "essential activities." The order is set to last until April 30.
  • While houses of worship are exempt from the stay-at-home order, DeSantis has encouraged religious leaders to hold services online or outside to minimize person-to-person contact.
  • All public and private K-12 school campuses are closed through May 1.
  • Some municipalities across the state have enacted even more stringent measures, with curfews and fines to discourage people from leaving their homes.
  • Beaches in Broward and Palm Beach counties were ordered closed, but beaches in other parts of the state remain open. DeSantis directed those accessing public beaches to limit their gatherings to no more than 10 people.
  • DeSantis moved to allow recently retired law enforcement and health care workers to immediately reenter the workforce.
  • DeSantis issued an executive order directing all Florida residents traveling from New York, New Jersey or Connecticut to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Health care practitioners were ordered to stop performing elective and nonessential procedures beginning March 20.
  • An April 2 executive order blocks the evictions of residents unable to pay rent because of the coronavirus, and suspends all mortgage foreclosures, for 45 days.
  • DeSantis announced on April 11 that more than 32,000 laptop computers are being distributed to 34 small, mostly rural school districts to facilitate distance learning.
  • An executive order prohibiting short-term vacation rentals of homes and condominiums has been extended through April 30.
  • Georgia

  • Gov. Brian Kemp issued a statewide shelter-in-place order on April 3, which has been extended through April 30.
  • Georgia's public health state of emergency has been extended through May 13.
  • Kemp extended the closure of all public K-12 schools through the end of the school year.
  • Kempsaid on March 31that the Georgia National Guard will be deployed to assisted living facilities and nursing homes to assist with containment measures.
  • Beaches and state parks remain open, though there are restrictions on the use of chairs, tents and umbrellas on beaches.
  • Georgia is working to increase hospital capacity for an anticipated COVID-19 patient surge. It purchased four temporary medical units, for a total of 88 beds, to be deployed across the state in mid-April. It is also reopening two health care facilities to increase the number of general and ICU beds available for coronavirus patients over the course of April and May.
  • An April 8 executive order suspends short-term vacation rentals across the state through April 30.
  • Georgia's primary elections have been delayed to June 9.
  • Preparations are underway to build a 200-hospital bed alternate care facility at the Georgia World Congress Center.
  • Kemp signed an order suspending enforcement of the state's anti-mask statute so that Georgians can comply with public health guidance.
  • Hawaii

  • Gov. David Ige issued a statewide stay-at-home order effective March 25 through April 30. Individuals may leave their place of residence only to perform essential activities, engage in essential businesses and operations, and conduct work that cannot be completed remotely.
  • Essential businesses are ordered to implement specific social distancing measures. Other "places of public gathering" are closed, and public gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited.
  • Penalties for intentionally breaking the stay-at-home order include a fine of up to $5,000, a year in prison, or both.
  • Ige has ordered a 14-day self-quarantine for everyone arriving in Hawaii as well as inter-island travelers in April.
  • The Democratic party-run presidential primary is switching to all mail-in voting.
  • The Hawaii State Judiciary has postponed most traffic, criminal and civil cases until after April 30.
  • Idaho

  • Gov. Brad Little issueda statewide stay-home order on March 25, effective for 21 days. On April 7, just over a week before the order is set to expire, Little said at a virtual town hall that "we will not return to normal on April 16."
  • The governor issued proclamations allowing emergency refills of up to 90 days for existing medications while also suspending Medicaid copay requirements during this emergency.
  • The state moved nearly $40 million to a disaster relief fund available immediately to first responders, health care workers and groups working to provide ventilators, hospital beds, rapid test kits and other critical supplies.
  • Idaho's primary election, set for May 19, will be conducted by mail.
  • Little suspended regulations in order to increase access to telehealth services and make it easier for medical professionals fighting the coronavirus to obtain necessary licenses.
  • The State Board of Education voted on April 6 to extend the "soft closure" of public school buildings through the end of the academic year, but is also giving local districts and charter schools the flexibility to reopen facilities if they satisfy certain criteria.
  • Illinois

  • Gov. J.B. Pritzker issued a stay-at-home or in-place-of-residence order that allows for residents to leave for essential activities, essential government functions or to operate essential businesses or operations.The order lasts until April 30.
  • The governor initiallyordered all schools throughout the state closed until March 30. This was extended to April 30 under the stay-at-home order extension.
  • On March 27, Pritzker announced measures to expand SNAP benefits and increase support for child care providers and people experiencing homelessness.
  • All essential workers in health care, human services, government services, and infrastructure qualify for the state's Child Care Assistance Program as of April 1.
  • Under an executive order issued April 6, the Illinois Department of Corrections director can allow "medically vulnerable" inmates to temporarily leave prison for the duration of the state's disaster proclamation.
  • Illinois' tax filing deadline has been extended to July 15.
  • The state awarded $14 million to over 700 bars, restaurants and hotels through the Hospitality Emergency Grant Program.
  • Pritzker introduced a Remote Patient Monitoring Program, through which health workers will provide wellness kits and daily virtual visits to COVID-19 patients recovering at home.
  • The Illinois Department of Human Services launched a free emotional support text line for anyone experiencing coronavirus-related stress.
  • Indiana

  • Gov. Eric Holcomb ordered Indiana residents to remain in their homes except for work deemed essential, caring for others and obtaining necessary supplies, beginning March 25.He issued a new two-week stay-at-home order on April 6, whichextends earlier restrictions such as those limiting on-site restaurant, bar, and nightclub operations. It also closes campgrounds and requires essential businesses to follow specific social distancing measures.
  • Schools statewide are closed until May 1. Holcomb issued an executive order waiving education requirements that cannot be met due to the closure of school buildings.
  • Holcomb postponed the state's presidential primary from May 5 to June 2.
  • The governor prohibited utilities from cutting off services and banned landlords from evicting people from residential homes and communities.
  • Holcomb announced incarcerated individuals at the Miami Correctional Facility are producing face masks, personal protection gowns, face shields and hand sanitizer to be used in the fight against COVID-19.
  • Holcomb signed an executive order on April 7 allowing retired and inactive EMS professionals to provide health care services if they work under a licensed supervisor or obtain a temporary certification from the state's Department of Homeland Security.
  • Religious and spiritual gatherings are capped at 10 people. Holcomb issued additional guidance for places of worship, encouraging them to close physical locations and conduct services virtually. The directive also lists restrictions for drive-in services and discourages vulnerable individuals from attending.
  • Iowa

  • Gov. Kim Reynolds has not issued a statewide stay-at-home order, but has signed multiple proclamations continuing the State Public Health Emergency Declaration initially announced on March 17.
  • Provisions of these proclamations include: the closure of schools and the waiving of time requirements as long as school districts put in place a continuous learning plan until April 30, the suspension of elective and nonessential medical procedures, and the prohibition of gatherings larger than 10 people.
  • Reynolds has extended closures and limitations for restaurants, bars, and certain retail stores. Her April 6 proclamation imposes additional regulations including the closure of malls, entertainment venues, playgrounds, campgrounds, tobacco stores, museums, and libraries until April 30.
  • Reynolds also called on police to enforce the prohibition on public gatherings larger than 10 people.
  • The state said existing permits to carry or acquire a firearm will not expire until further notice.
  • An April 10 proclamation extended the emergency declaration through 11:59 p.m. on April 30 and introduced additional regulatory relief measures.The provisions give health facilities greater flexibility, remove some in-person regulatory requirements and "permit community colleges and school districts to adjust to the suspension of in-person instruction."
  • Kansas

  • Gov. Laura Kelly signed a statewide stay-at-home order that will remain until place until at least April 19. The directive shuts down businesses, government and other operations unless considered essential. People must maintain six feet from others in public, and limit gatherings to no more than 10 people. Kellysaidshe will extend the order.
  • The governor extended the closings of K-12 schools for the duration of the academic school year.
  • Kelly issued an executive order temporarily preventing foreclosures and evictions.
  • State government operations were suspended for two weeks beginning March 23 and gradually reintroduced beginning April 6, with a majority of state employees working remotely.
  • Kelly signed an executive order on April 7 that designates religious services and funerals as "essential functions," but limits in-person gatherings to no more than 10 people and requires clergy to adhere to the safety protocols outlined in the stay-at-home order. State lawmakers voted along party lines to overturn the order the following day, saying it violated religious liberty. Kelly's administration sued the legislative council in Kansas Supreme Court, which ruled unanimously to uphold the order.
  • An April 10 executive order extends professional and occupational licenses for the duration of the pandemic, waives late penalties and expiration fees, and extends deadlines for continuing education requirements.
  • Kentucky

  • Gov. Andy Beshear enacted a statewide "Healthy at Home" order effective March 26. All "non-life-sustaining" businesses ceased in-person services, with exceptions includinggrocery stores, gas stations, hardware stores and firearm and ammunition retailers. The order also halted all residential evictions for the duration of the state of emergency.
  • Restaurants can offer only carry-out, delivery, and drive-through food and beverage services. All essential businesses permitted to operate are required to follow social distancing and hygiene guidance from the CDC and state public health department.
  • Beshear signed an order urging Kentucky residents not to leave the state and limited out of state travel for residents of Kentucky, with a handful of exceptions, including when required for employment or to seek or obtain care by a health care provider. The order also requires Kentuckians traveling from out of state to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.
  • On April 2, Beshear applied travel restrictions to residents of other states seeking to travel into Kentucky, "except in specific circumstances."
  • Beshear recommended school districts extend their suspension of in-person instruction to at least May 1; announcedplans to commute the sentences of hundreds of nonviolent offenders; and moved to convert state fairgrounds in Louisville into a 2,000 hospital makeshift bed.
  • Most state parks remain open during the day, but their lodges, cottages, restaurants, and campgrounds are closed.
  • Kentucky is adopting guidance from the CDC to wear cloth masks in certain situations "on a voluntary basis," in addition to practicing social distancing.
  • An executive order issued April 8 limits the number of shoppers allowed inside essential businesses to "one adult member per household."
  • Pharmacists across the state are permitted to dispense emergency refills of up to a 30 day supply of non-scheduled medications for Kentucky residents, and can temporarily operate pharmacies in areas not designated on the pharmacy permit. These provisions are set to expire on May 8.
  • Kentucky residents receiving unemployment insurance benefits will get an additional $600 payment per week through an approved federal funding stream.
  • Beshear expanded workers' compensation eligibility to front-line personnel.
  • Kentucky's primary election has been postponed from May 19 to June 23. The State Board of Elections is preparing to conduct it largely through absentee voting.
  • The Kentucky Exposition Center is being converted into a temporary 2,000-bed field hospital.
  • Beshear ordered individuals who attended the seven in-person services held on Easter to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Louisiana

  • Gov. John Bel Edwards issued a statewide stay-at-home order through the morning of April 30. Nonessential businesses must remain closed, and gatherings larger than 10 people are prohibited. People can still do essential tasks such as go to the grocery store, pick up prescriptions or go to work "if absolutely necessary."
  • Edwards declared a public health emergency on March 11. By March 24, President Trump had approved the governor's request for a Major Disaster Declaration, allowing the federal government to offer more support for state and local agencies.
  • The governor also closed public schools statewide through April 30. The State Board of Elementary and Secondary Education has asked him to extend closures through the end of the academic year.
  • Louisiana's primary election was rescheduled from April 4 to June 20. Its municipal general election was postponed from May 9 to July 25.
  • The newly-announced Louisiana COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force set out to examine how health inequities are affecting communities impacted by the coronavirus.
  • Maine

  • Gov. Janet Mills issued an order directing residents to "stay at home at all times unless for an essential job or an essential personal reason, such as obtaining food, medicine, health care, or other necessary purposes" until at least April 30.
  • Restaurants and bars are closed to dine-in customers for the duration of the stay-at-home order. Essential businesses must comply with specific social distancing measures, including limiting the number of customers allowed inside at any one time.
  • Individuals must maintain a six-foot distance from others when in public.
  • Public and private schools and institutes of higher education have suspended classroom and in-person instruction until at least May 1. The commissioner of education has recommended schools continue remote learning for the duration of the academic year.
  • The state legislature approved Gov. Mills' emergency package worth roughly $11 million that expands eligibility for unemployment benefits and prohibits utilities from terminating residential electric and water service.
  • Mills issued an executive order mandating that all travelers entering Maine, regardless of their state of residency, self-quarantine for 14 days. It exempts individuals who are providing "essential services."
  • The order also suspends lodging operations like hotels and short-term rentals, except for those accommodating essential workers and vulnerable populations. It extends until at least April 30.
  • Mills issued an executive order on April 7 that expands access to health care by allowing licensed social workers, psychologists and physical therapists to provide services via telehealth. It also allows certain health care providers like respiratory therapists and pharmacists to receive temporary licenses to provide care if licensed in another state, or reactivate their Maine license if retired within the last three years.
  • Preparation is underway to open two alternative care sites in Portland and Bangor.
  • Maine's primary election has been rescheduled to July 14. Applications for absentee ballots can be made, without specifying a reason, up to and including the day of the election.
  • Maryland

  • Gov. Larry Hogan announced a statewide stay-at-home order on March 30, demanding residents not leave their homes or travel outside the state unless it is absolutely essential.
  • Maryland residents returning home from out of state are directed to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Nonessential businesses are closed, and gatherings larger than 10 people are prohibited.
  • All public K-12 schools throughout the state are closed untilApril 24.
  • All day care facilities were ordered closed by the end of the day March 27. Exceptions will be made for facilities providing child care assistance to essential personnel.
  • The governor also ordered recreational and entertainment facilities such as malls, casinos and racetracks to close. Restaurants and bars that serve food are carryout or delivery only.
  • Maryland postponed its April 28 primary election to June 2. It will be conducted by mail with limited in-person voting.
  • Hogan suspended certain regulations to allow for the temporary expansion of telehealth services.
  • Maryland's income tax deadline has been extended to July 15.
  • Hogan banned evictions of tenants who are unable to pay rent because of the coronavirus, and prohibited utility companies from shutting off residential service and charging residential late fees.
  • An April 3 order extended those renter protections and introduced new provisions. Certain repossessions are suspended, residential mortgage closures may not be initiated, and commercial evictions are prohibited as long as tenants can prove they lost income because of the coronavirus.
  • Hogan authorized local health departments to "take action against any businesses, establishments, and construction sites they deem unsafe," allowing them to work with local law enforcement to modify operations or shut such sites down altogether.
  • On April 10, Hogan announced an immediate hiring and budget freeze on discretionary state spending across all agencies.
  • Massachusetts

  • Gov. Charlie Baker ordered nonessential businesses to close throughout the state until May 4. Businesses that provide essential services, such as restaurants and pharmacies, are excluded, including liquor stores and medical marijuana shops. Restaurants may operate through carryout and delivery service only.
  • Baker on March 27 ordered all travelers arriving from out of state to self-quarantine for 14 days. Residents over 70 or with underlying health conditions have been "strongly advised" to stay home.
  • All K-12 schools and non-emergency early education programs were ordered closed through May 4. Educators are required to provide students with remote learning resources through the month of April.
  • Baker issued an emergency order allowing physicians who retired in good standing within the past year to reactivate their licenses.
  • State courts announced that no evictions would occur until at least April 21.
  • State authorities rolled out an online portal to facilitate the donation or sale of personal protective equipment.
  • An emergency order closed all coastal beach reservation parking areas managed by the Department of Conservation and Recreation beginning April 3. It also reopened certain seasonal state parks ahead of schedule that same day.
  • Massachusetts extended its state income tax filing deadline to July 15.
  • Grocery stores must limit occupancy to 40 percent of their maximum permitted levels, enforce social distancing measures, and provide alternative hours for adults over the age of 60.
  • Baker issued emergency orders easing licensing restrictions for foreign-educated doctors to practice in the state, expediting the licensure of nursing school students and graduates, and mandating that insurers cover all "medically required costs of COVID-19 treatment" in out-of-network hospitals.
  • The use of a face covering or cloth mask is recommended when in situations where it is difficult to maintain proper social distancing measures, such as grocery shopping.
  • Baker's administration announced the launch of the Manufacturing Emergency Response Team, along with $10.6 million in funding. The initiative will support manufacturers as they pivot operations to produce personal protective equipment and other critical supplies for front line and health care workers.
  • Michigan

  • Gov. Gretchen Whitmer issued a statewide stay-at-home order, now effective through April 30. The extension of the order, announced April 9, introduced stricter restrictions for essential businesses. Stores must limit the number of customers per thousand square feet, and big box stores must close "any area that does not sell food, cleaning supplies, or medical supplies."
  • The order extends the prohibition on "all public and private gatherings among persons outside a single household" and encourages people to limit the number of household members running errands.
  • Whitmer issued a rule banning employers from firing or otherwise retaliating against an employee "for staying home from work if they or one of their close contacts tests positive for COVID-19 or has symptoms of the disease."
  • Whitmer signed an executive order extending deadline to complete the canvass from the March 10 presidential primary by a month to April 24.
  • All K-12 public, private and boarding school buildings were ordered closed through the end of the school year, with most in-person classes replaced with remote learning.
  • Whitmer issued an executive order temporarily suspending eviction allowing residents to remain in their homes even if they are unable to pay their rent or mortgage. She also expanded eligibility for unemployment benefits.
  • The governor signed an order to protect incarcerated people held in county jails, local lockups and juvenile detention centers during the outbreak. It identifies people potentially eligible for early release including inmates who are aging or those with chronic conditions, pregnant women or people nearing their release date, and anyone incarcerated for a traffic violation and failure to appear or failure to pay.
  • Whitmer has temporarily suspended requirements regarding the licensing and regulation of emergency medical services.
  • The TCF Regional Care Center, Michigan's first alternate care facility, began accepting patients on April 10.
  • Workers on state unemployment are receiving a weekly additional $600 federal payment under the CARES Act. Beginning April 13, Michigan's self-employed workers, gig workers, 1099 independent contractors and low-wage workers affected by COVID-19 can apply for federal Pandemic Unemployment Assistance.
  • Whitmer signed an executive order temporarily extending valid driver's licenses, state identification cards and commercial vehicle registrations that would otherwise expire during the state of emergency.
  • Whitmer also ordered the Michigan Liquor Control Commission to initiate a spirits buy-back program to help bars and restaurants with on-premise liquor licenses. Licensees must request to participate by 5:00 p.m. on April 17.
  • Minnesota

  • Gov. Tim Walz has extended the statewide stay-at-home order through May 4. Nonessential businesses remain closed, and Minnesotans may only leave their residences for certain essential purposes.
  • Walz announced on April 2 that the state's health plans — including those offered by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota and HealthPartners, among others — have agreed to waive expenses related to COVID-19 testing and treatment.
  • The governor issued a "temporary moratorium on eviction actions" allowing residents to remain "stably housed" while safeguarding the public.
  • Walz signed two executive orders on April 6: one that authorizes out-of-state mental health providers to treat Minnesota patients through telehealth services, and one that amends a previous order aimed at expediting state unemployment insurance benefits.
  • The state passed a bill expanding workers' compensation eligibility for first responders and front-line workers by allowing them to qualify for benefits if they test positive for COVID-19.
  • Public and charter schools began distance learning on March 30, and will remain closed until at least April 30.
  • Mississippi

  • On April 1, Gov. Tate Reeves issued a statewide stay-at-home order, banning residents from leaving the home for activities deemed nonessential.
  • Reeves ordered all public schools in the state closed until April 17.
  • On March 24 the governor signed an executive order restricting gatherings to groups of 10 people or less; bars and restaurants move to drive-thru, delivery or carryout unless able to reduce dine-in service to less than 10 people. That order is in effect until April 17.
  • The Mississippi State Department of Health is recommending people wear non-medical grade masks when in public.
  • Reeves called on pastors to not hold Easter Sunday services, but said he would not order churches to close.
  • Beginning April 10, health care facilities must postpone all surgeries and procedures that are not immediately medically necessary. The order is in effect until April 27.
  • Reeves signed an executive order granting additional civil liability protections for health care workers and facilities responding to COVID-19 outside of their normal duties.
  • Missouri

  • Gov. Mike Parson issued a statewide "Stay Home Missouri" order effective until April 24. Missourians are allowed to perform essential services like going to grocery stores and banks, while observing social distancing requirements.
  • The governor signed an executive order on March 27 to begin mobilizing the Missouri National Guard. The order goes through at least May 15.
  • Parson announced on April 8 that the state would begin converting a hotel in the St. Louis region into an alternate care site.
  • As of April 9, Missouri public and charter school buildings are closed through the remainder of the academic year.
  • Parson signed a $6.2 billion supplemental budget on April 10 that will provide access to federal funding under the CARES Act for coronavirus-related expenses and economic relief.
  • Missouri's Department of Transportation received a $61.7 million federal grant for rural transit as part of the CARES Act.
  • Montana

  • Gov. Steve Bullock issued a statewide stay-at-home directive effective March 28. He has since extended it through April 24.
  • The order closes nonessential businesses, provides social distancing requirements, and limits nonessential travel.On-premises dining and beverage businesses are closed, but delivery, takeout and drive-through options are encouraged.
  • All non-residential public schools in the state will be closed through April 24.
  • All travelers arriving in Montana from out of the state for non-work purposes are directed to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • The state has temporarily halted "evictions, foreclosures and cancellation of utility services including water, heating and internet service."
  • Bullock implemented emergency rules that make workers laid off or unable to work due to COVID-19 eligible for unemployment benefits, and waive the one week waiting period before receiving benefits.
  • Child care facilities are classified as essential businesses, but may only operate if they can comply with specific safety and social distancing measures.
  • Montanans are encouraged to wear cloth masks or face coverings when in public, in line with CDC guidelines.
  • Bullock directed the creation of a program to provide emergency rental assistance to families experiencing "substantial financial hardship" due to COVID-19.
  • Nebraska

  • Gov. Pete Ricketts has not issued a stay-at-home order, though Dr. Anthony Fauci of the White House Coronavirus Task Force has called the state's health directives "functionally equivalent." All counties are now covered by Nebraska's Directed Health Measure provisions, which apply statewide through May 11.
  • The state-issued measure places an enforceable, 10-person limit on public gatherings. It also prohibits elective medical and dental procedures. Restaurants and bars must close, but can operate takeout, delivery, and curbside service.
  • Public, private, and parochial schools must operate without students through May 31, and all school-related extracurricular activities are cancelled through that date. Remote learning, child care services, and meal distribution may continue.
  • People who have tested positive for COVID-19, experience symptoms or reside with individuals who do must home quarantine for at least 14 days.
  • The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services has issued safety and social distancing guidance for faith-based communities.
  • Beginning April 10, all beauty and nail salons, barber shops, massage therapy services, gentlemen's clubs, bottle clubs, indoor theaters and tattoo studios across the state are closed until April 30.
  • Organized youth and adult team sports are suspended until May 31.
  • Ricketts proclaimed April 10-30 as "21 Days To Stay Home and Stay Healthy," urging Nebraskans to perform their civic duty by further avoiding nonessential errands and limiting social gatherings.
  • The proclamation offers additional guidance for practicing good hygiene and social distancing, directing people to telecommute or else "socially distance" their work, avoid visiting long-term care facilities, help children and seniors stay home, and shop alone and only once a week.
  • Ricketts said on April 10 that he will not prematurely release individuals from state prisons during the pandemic.
  • The state is expanding SNAP benefits by easing certain eligibility requirements. It is also extending recertification periods by six months and providing emergency allotments to SNAP recipients in April and May.
  • Nevada

  • The state issued a stay-at-home directive. The order, which exempts certain "essential employees" such as medical professionals, extends through at least April 30.
  • Gov. Steve Sisolak has ordered nonessential businesses to close until April 30, in a directive that also grants local governments the authority to impose fines for noncompliance.
  • School closures have beenextendedthrough April 30.
  • The governor signed an executive order banning the use of two prescription drugs — chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine — to treat COVID-19. It exempts those receiving in-patient treatment for lupus or other diseases. The regulation is intended to thwart hoarding of the drugs.
  • The state issued a moratorium on all evictions, with a 90-day grace period on mortgage payments.
  • Visitors and residents returning from out of state have been urged to self-quarantine for two weeks after their arrival.
  • Sisolak issued several new directives on April 8, effective through April 30.The orders shut down additional sporting and recreational venues, as well as showrooms that display goods for sale at essential businesses. Realtors are prohibited from doing in-person showings and open houses, and barbers and stylists cannot offer in-home beauty services.Places of worship are ordered to limit gatherings to no more than 10 people.
  • New Hampshire

  • Gov. Chris Sununu issued a stay-at-home order on March 26, mandating the closure of all nonessential businesses and requiring people to stay in their place of residence except for certain permitted activities. The order remains in effect until May 4.
  • Sununu has expanded the number of circumstances that qualify for state unemployment.
  • Sununu also ordered all K-12 public schools to use remote instruction through May 4. Standardized testing requirements are also suspended. Sununu told NHPR on April 13 that "it doesn't look likely" schools will reopen before the end of the academic year.
  • Business tax payment deadlines for most of the small businesses throughout the state are delayed until June 15.
  • Utilities in the state are prohibited from disconnecting service for non-payments through the duration of the emergency.
  • An emergency order halts eviction proceedings and foreclosure actions throughthe duration of the emergency.
  • On April 6, Sununu issued an emergency order restricting hotels and lodging providers to offer housing only to essential workers and vulnerable populations, as defined by the order.
  • Absentee voting eligibility has been expanded to allow any New Hampshire voter concerned about visiting polling places to request an absentee ballot. This applies to the September primary and November general election regardless of how the outbreak may have progressed by the fall.
  • New Jersey

  • Gov. Phil Murphy has instructed New Jersey residents to stay home indefinitely, except for "obtaining essential goods or services, seeking medical attention, visiting family or close friends, reporting to work, or engaging in outdoor activities."
  • All gatherings are prohibited, with very few exceptions, and people must stay at least 6 feet apart from each other in public if possible.
  • The state's attorney general has said that law enforcement will enforce the governor's executive orders, and people who don't comply will face criminal charges.
  • Businesses are directed to switch to work-from-home arrangements wherever possible.
  • Murphy says state officials are working to reopen closed hospitals and set up regional field medical stations to add at least 2,300 beds.
  • All public schools are closed indefinitely.Essential workers qualify for assistance for child care costs.
  • Murphy has signed a number of executive orders intended to help meet the need for ventilators and Personal Protective Equipment in state health care facilities, including an April 2 order authorizing the commandeering of property like medical supplies from private entities.
  • Murphy also signed an order that allows retirees to return to state and local government without impacting their retirement pensions, and removes restrictions on law enforcement's ability to temporarily supplement their ranks, in an effort to strengthen the public workforce.
  • Murphy signed an executive order waiving 2019-2020 school year assessment requirements for 11th and 12th grade students. He also signed an order to extend certain statutory deadlines for school districts whose April elections were postponed until May 12, to give them time to certify their budgets and make staffing decisions.
  • An April 7 executive order closed all country parks, state parks and state forests indefinitely.
  • The state's primary elections, originally set for June 2, were rescheduled to July 7.
  • Murphy signed an executive order requiring all nonessential construction projects to cease by 8:00 p.m. on April 10. The order imposes additional mitigation requirements on essential retail, manufacturing and warehousing businesses.
  • Murphy signed an executive order establishing a process to provide "temporary home confinement"or grant early parole for incarcerated individuals who meet certain criteria.
  • FEMA approved the state's request to provide emergency, non-congregate sheltering for "individuals impacted by COVID-19 that do not have means or ability to isolate themselves," expanding housing access for vulnerable individuals, health care workers and first responders.
  • The governors of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Delaware announced on April 13 the creation of a multi-state council that will develop a regional framework for safely and gradually lifting stay-at-home orders and restoring the economy. 
  • Murphy signed an executive order prohibiting cable and telecommunications providers from terminating internet and voice service due to nonpayment until 30 days after the public health emergency.
  • New Mexico

  • Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham issued a stay-at-home order requiring nonessential businesses to close and 100% of the nonessential workforce to work from home. Residents are instructed to make only emergency or essential outings.An executive order issued April 6 extended the state of public health emergency and all associated directives through April 30.
  • The order also requires essential businesses still operating to limit occupancy in retail spaces and enforce social distancing protocols, and deems automobile dealerships, payday lenders and liquor stores non-essential. It mandates that hotels and other places of lodging operate at no more than 25 percent of maximum occupancy, reduced from 50 percent.
  • Businesses that fail to comply could "lose their licenses to operate and face criminal or civil penalties."
  • Gatherings of five or more people in a single confined space are not allowed.
  • Grisham has ordered people traveling by plane to the state to self-quarantine for at least two weeks.
  • K-12 public schools will remain closed through the rest of the school year, and public education will switch to learn-at-home.
  • New Mexicans are encouraged to wear cloth, non-medical masks when in public, in line with CDC guidance.
  • Just before Easter, Grisham expanded the mass gathering ban to include houses of worship.
  • New York

  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo mandated that all nonessential workers stay home as part of the "New York State on Pause" executive order, which he renewed on April 7. Schools and nonessential businesses must stay closed through April 29.
  • Cuomo has temporarily banned "all nonessential gatherings of individuals of size for any reason." People are required to maintain a six-foot distance from others in public.
  • New York City playgrounds are closing "to address the lack of adherence to social distancing protocols."
  • Beginning April 7, New York increased the maximum fine for violations of its social distancing protocol from $500 to $1,000.
  • Federal and local officials built a temporary 1,000-bed hospital at the Javits Center in Manhattan, and are in the process of adding thousands of additional beds.
  • President Trump agreed to the governor's request to treat coronavirus patients on the USNS Comfort, which will provide an additional 1,000 beds staffed by federal personnel.
  • The state is making an additional $600 in weekly unemployment benefits available to all New Yorkers, and has extended the period covered by unemployment benefits to a total of 39 weeks.
  • Cuomo issued an order allowing funeral directors licensed out of state to practice in New York.
  • The state's presidential primary has been moved to June 23. Cuomo issued an executive order allowing all New York voters to cast absentee ballots.
  • An additional $200 million in emergency food assistance will be available for SNAP-eligible households.
  • New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio said on April 11 that the city's public schools will remain closed for the rest of the academic year, but Cuomo has yet to finalize such a decision.
  • Cuomo ordered all essential businesses to provide face coverings for their employees and ensure workers are wearing them when in direct contact with customers or members of the public, beginning April 15.
  • The governors of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Delaware announced on April 13 the creation of a multi-state council that will develop a regional framework for safely and gradually lifting stay-at-home orders and restoring the economy. 
  • North Carolina

  • Gov. Roy Cooper announced a statewide stay-at-home order that will be in effect through April 29. The order directs North Carolina residents to leave only for "essential activities," and maintain social distancing of at least six feet.
  • K-12 public schools statewide are closed through May 15.
  • The state is temporarily prohibiting utilities from cutting off people who are unable to pay for their "electric, gas, water and wastewater services."
  • North Carolina's tax filing deadline has been extended to July 15 for individual, corporate, and franchise taxes, in keeping with the rescheduled IRS due date.
  • On April 7, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services announced it would provide financial assistance to help certain eligible essential workers afford child care, and give bonuses to child care teachers and staff working during the pandemic.
  • The state received approval from FEMA to establish alternative housing for people with unstable housing who must quarantine either as a precautionary measure or after being exposed to the virus. The state aims to provide more than 16,500 individual housing units in hotels, motels, dormitories, and trailers.
  • Cooper called on people to avoid gathering for Easter and Passover.
  • An April 9 executive order requires retail stores still operating to implement stricter social distancing policies, like limiting the number people inside at once requiring specific cleaning measures, and designating certain shopping times for high-risk individuals.
  • The order makes specific public health and safety measures mandatory for nursing homes, and recommends other long-term care facilities follow those directives. It also streamlines the process for employers filing unemployment claims on behalf of their workers.
  • North Dakota

  • Gov. Doug Burgum has not issued a statewide stay-at-home order.
  • Many types of businesses have been ordered to close until April 20, including recreational facilities, gyms, theaters and "all salons operated by licensed cosmetologists." Restaurants and bars are closed to on-site patrons, but takeout and delivery services can continue.
  • As of March 30, public and non-public K-12 schools are closed "until further notice." An executive order will allow some public school districts to "open facilities through the month of May, for the limited purpose of providing child care services to children in grades K-5 only, for K-12 teachers and other health, safety and lifeline worker households."
  • Burgum issued an executive order waiving the one-week waiting period to obtain unemployment benefits, as the state saw a surge in jobless claims.
  • Individuals who test positive for COVID-19, and their household members, are ordered to self-quarantine in their place of residence for 14 days, according to an April 6 executive order.
  • Burgum signed an order suspending visitation to long-term care facilities, "except in cases of end-of-life or compassionate care circumstances," until further notice.
  • Burgum signed an executive order allowing Psychiatric Residential Treatment Facilities and Qualified Residential Treatment Programs to make certain policy and regulatory changes in order to continue providing critical services for vulnerable youth. 
  • Ohio

  • Gov. Mike DeWine has issued a stay-at-home order, which requires individuals to stay at least 6 feet away from each other "as much as reasonably possible," excluding people that they live with. It is to remain in effect until at least May 1.
  • An expanded stay-at-home order took effect at 11:59 p.m. on April 6 that requires essential business to limit the number of customers allowed in stores and asks travelers entering Ohio to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Voters who didn't make it to the polls on March 17 may still cast a ballot. Although most in-person voting for the primary has been eliminated, absentee voting has been extended until April 28.
  • Residents are encouraged to donate personal protection equipment to Ohio health care workers and first responders by contacting local emergency management agency offices.
  • Ohio schools are closed until at least May 1, and DeWine has said that "there is the real possibility that our schools can stay closed longer than this."
  • An executive order signed April 4 expands access to telehealth services from counselors, social workers, and marriage and family counselors by eliminating certain requirements.
  • DeWine signed an executive order into effect on April 7 that allows establishments with liquor licenses to sell and deliver drinks, including high-proof liquor, for off-premises consumption.
  • Ohioans are encouraged to wear cloth masks in public, in line with CDC recommendations.
  • DeWine is taking steps to secure the release of 167 inmates from state prisons. Many of them qualify for early release under an existing emergency overcrowding statue. Others are at-risk individuals — over the age of 60 with at least one chronic health condition — who have already been screened.
  • In response to people traveling from out of state to purchase alcohol, in-person liquor sales in border counties have been restricted to Ohio residents only.
  • The Ohio Department of Health ordered long-term care facilities to notify residents and families within 24 hours of a staff member or resident testing positive for COVID-19.
  • DeWine signed an executive order providing nearly $5 million in emergency funding to Ohio's food banks and hunger relief network.
  • Oklahoma

  • Gov. Kevin Stitt issued a statewide "Safer at Home" order for adults over the age of 65 and individuals with serious underlying medical conditions. The order, in place through April 30, now applies to all counties in the state.
  • The order also limits gatherings to no more than 10 people, prohibits visitation to nursing homes and long-term care facilities, and postpones all elective and non-emergency medical and dental procedures.
  • Stitt has issued an executive order requiring travelers from New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Washington, California and Louisiana to quarantine for 14 days.
  • On April 2, Stitt declared a health emergency for 30 days, which grants him broader powers to waive certain regulatory requirements and coordinate between local health departments.
  • All delivery personnel must submit to screening if asked at hospitals, clinics, long-term care facilities and schools before making a delivery.
  • Nonessential businesses are closed, and restaurants may only offer curbside pickup and delivery.
  • Starting April 6, school "districts will be expected to provide distance learning for the remainder of the school year," according to state officials.
  • Oklahoma State University is ramping up its capacity to perform up 2,000 tests per day.
  • Stitt approved an emergency rule that provides hiring flexibilities for nurse aides for the duration of the emergency declaration.
  • On April 6, the Oklahoma Legislature approved the Catastrophic Health Emergency Act, which gives Stitt the power to temporarily "suspend laws and regulations that interfere with the state's ability to respond to the pandemic."
  • Stitt issued an executive order guaranteeing first responders paid time off if they contract COVID-19.
  • Stitt approved the commutations of 452 individuals, who will be released from prison on April 16.
  • Oregon

  • Gov. Kate Brown has issued an order directing Oregonians to "stay at home to the maximum extent possible," which remains in effect indefinitely.
  • The order prohibits all gatherings, no matter what size, if people can't maintain a distance of 6 feet from each other.
  • Oregon's K-12 and post-secondary schools are closed through the end of the academic year. Educators are encouraged to complete the term through distance learning.
  • Dine-in service at restaurants and bars is banned indefinitely.
  • A temporary moratorium on all residential evictions has been put in place indefinitely, and landlords may not charge late fees for late rent or utility payments.
  • The state's tax filing and payment deadlines for personal income taxes and some other taxes have been extended through July 15.
  • Brown issued a statement on April 7 encouraging Oregonians to wear cloth face masks when out in public, in line with CDC guidance.
  • Oregon will provide an extra $30 million in SNAP benefits to eligible households in both April and May.
  • The state fire marshal has extended self-service at gas stations through April 25.
  • In an April 10 statement, Brown said decisions about potential early release for incarcerated individuals should be made on a case-by-case basis, and she had "no specific plans" to abandon that approach.
  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington announced the Western States Pact on April 13. The framework offers principles and goals for a shared approach to reopening states' economies.
  • Brown announced on April 13 that the state would provide $8 million total to the Oregon Food Bank Network in weekly payments over the next two months.
  • Pennsylvania

  • Gov. Tom Wolf has issued a statewide stay-at-home order effective until April 30.
  • Pennsylvania residents are allowed to leave their homes for a few select reasons, such as "tasks essential to maintain health and safety" and "getting necessary services or supplies."
  • Wolf updated the stay-at-home order guidance on April 4 to encourage religious leaders to "find alternatives to in-person gatherings," especially in light of holidays like Easter and Passover.
  • Schools across the state will remain closed through the end of the academic year. Meals will still be available for pickup at designated sites, and teachers are encouraged to provide "continuity of education."
  • Wolf also announced that $50 million in state funding will be spent to purchase medical equipment and supplies for hospitals, nursing homes, and emergency workers.
  • Wolf ordered the state Department of Corrections to establish a "Temporary Program to Reprieve Sentences of Incarceration," which would release eligible non-violent and vulnerable individuals from the state corrections system starting as soon as April 14. Those granted temporary reprieves would be equipped with reentry plans and monitored similarly to parolees.
  • Wolf announced a $450 million loan program for "financially strained" hospitals in the state. Applications close April 20, and costs must be incurred between March 1 and September 1.
  • Pennsylvanians receiving unemployment benefits will get an extra $600 payment each week through July, under the federal CARES Act.The act also temporarily makes self-employed workers, independent contractors and gig economy workers eligible for Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, and provides an additional 13 weeks of unemployment compensation.
  • The governors of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Delaware announced on April 13 the creation of a multi-state council that will develop a regional framework for safely and gradually lifting stay-at-home orders and restoring the economy.
  • Businesses that collect Pennsylvania state tax will not have to make Accelerated Sales Tax prepayments in April, May and June.
  • The Department of Revenue extended the deadline to file state personal income tax returns to July 15, and delayed the due date for corporations with tax returns due in May to August 14.
  • Puerto Rico

  • Gov. Wanda Vázquez Garced announced a state of emergency and the activation of the National Guard on March 12. An executive order mandated an island-wide curfew — from 9:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. — beginning March 15.
  • The governor has since changed the curfew's start time to 7:00 p.m. and extended it to May 3. The move does not affect business hours, which were established by executive order.
  • During curfew hours, people may only leave their homes to buy food and medicine or go to the bank. Nonessential businesses remain closed, though hardware stores and car repair shops are now permitted to operate "twice a week on limited schedules." Everyone must wear a mask when entering any business.
  • The ACLU announced on April 5 it was seeking an injunction to block part of the curfew, calling some of its restrictions unconstitutional.
  • People are allowed out of their homes to receive health care services and buy food supplies, according to a press release from the governor's office. Supermarkets are not operating on Sundays.
  • On April 8, Vázquez petitioned the Federal Aviation Administration to temporarily ban all flights from U.S. cities with large numbers of coronavirus cases. She specifically cited New York, Florida, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut and Illinois.
  • The governor signed an amendment making it illegal for media outlets or social media accounts "to transmit or allow the transmission" of "false information" relating to government proclamations or executive orders concerning COVID-19 or other disasters.This move has come under fire from the Committee to Protect Journalists.
  • Puerto Rico postponed its presidential primary to April 26.
  • Rhode Island

  • Gov. Gina Raimondo ordered Rhode Island residents to stay at home "unless traveling to work, traveling for medical treatment or obtaining necessities." She has extended this and other restrictions through May 8.
  • Gatherings of more than five people are prohibited. Public recreation, entertainment and close-contact businesses are closed. Restaurants, bars and cafes are closed to dine-in service but can sell wine and beer with take-out orders.
  • Anyone returning to the state from domestic or international travel, by any mode of transportation, must quarantine for 14 days.
  • Schools are participating in distance learning through April.
  • Raimondo has ordered that health insurance must cover telemedicine for primary care, specialty care and mental and behavioral health care.
  • State parks and beaches are closed indefinitely, and all state-based customer services will remain online only. The DMV is open by appointment only and has suspended all road tests.
  • Nursing homes and hospitals are not allowing visitors.
  • Courts are closed for all nonessential business, "including residential and commercial evictions," through May 17.
  • The governor has directed people to wear cloth face coverings when in public.
  • Rhode Island's has been postponed to June 2, and will be conducted "predominantly by mail."
  • An April 9 executive order issues stricter self-quarantine and self-isolation rules for any who has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or in close contact with a confirmed positive case. It also authorizes the health department to make and enforce additional rules, including through civil penalties. Raimondo said authorities could issue fines in "the hundreds of dollars range" to those who violate quarantine rules.
  • Goldman Sachs, in partnership with Rhode Island Commerce Corporation and Community Reinvestment Fund has committed $10 million in loans to small businesses in the state.
  • The governors of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Delaware announced on April 13 the creation of a multi-state council that will develop a regional framework for safely and gradually lifting stay-at-home orders and restoring the economy. 
  • Raimondo signed an executive order requiring client-facing businesses and nonprofits to provide face coverings to all employees, to be worn in the workplace with few exceptions. Businesses must also direct customers to wear face coverings. The order is effective April 18 for at least one month, and compliance will be monitored through Department of Business Regulation spot checks.
  • South Carolina

  • Gov. Henry McMaster announced a statewide "home or work" order, effective April 7 at 5 p.m. The order requires South Carolinians to remain "at home or work unless visiting family, exercising or obtaining essential goods or services."
  • Entertainment venues, recreational and athletic facilities, close-contact service providers, retail stores and other nonessential businesses were ordered closed beginning April 6.
  • McMaster also ordered all retail businesses still operating to limit the number of customers in one place at a time.
  • An executive order has extended the state's income tax deadline to July 15, in line with the new federal income tax deadline.
  • The governor has ordered that travelers from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Louisiana must self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Public schools are closed through the month of April.
  • McMaster issued an executive order allowing furloughed employees to qualify for unemployment benefits.
  • South Dakota

  • South Dakota has no statewide stay-at-home order. Gov. Kristi Noemissued an executive order through May 31 that strengthens the language used to require South Dakotans to practice CDC-recommended hygiene practices and social distancing. It also orders businesses and local and municipal governments to restrict gatherings of 10 or more people, tells employers to encourage staff to telework and social distance, and requires health care organizations to postpone all nonessential elective surgeries.
  • Noem also ordered adults over the age of 65, and anyone with certain underlying medical conditions, in Minnehaha and Lincoln counties to stay home. There are exceptions for critical infrastructure jobs and essential errands.
  • Health care providers are instructed to postpone nonessential elective surgeries.
  • Noem signed into law a bill that allows for injunctions to enforce directives or orders for the containment of a coronavirus respiratory syndrome.
  • Elections to be held between April 14 and May 26 have been postponed.
  • Requirements that students take national standardized tests have been waived.
  • The state has created a small business economic disaster relief subfund that can make appropriations.
  • On April 9, Noem extended her previous executive orders through May 31.
  • Schools are ordered to remain closed and continue with "distance learning" through the end of the academic year.
  • Tennessee

  • Gov. Bill Lee issued a safer-at-home order that restricts discretionary travel beginning March 31 at 11:59 p.m. A stronger stay-at-home order requires Tennesseeans stay in their place of residence except for carrying out essential activities. The orders have been extended through April 30.
  • Statewide school closures have been extended until April 24.
  • Work-from-home orders for state employees are extended through the same period.
  • The deadline to file franchise and excise taxes has been delayed until July 15.
  • The state is working with the Army Corps of Engineers to provide additional hospital beds if needed.
  • Tennessee put out a call to displaced or furloughed health care workers to join its efforts.
  • Lee said the state would follow federal guidelines that extend unemployment benefits to self-employed individuals through pandemic unemployment assistance.
  • The state is distributing $200 million in grants to its county and city governments for one-time, local expenses in fiscal year 2021. Funding is based on population and will be made available after July 1.
  • A man prays while attending an Easter service at Trinity Baptist Church in San Antonio on April 12. Governors in many states have encouraged houses of worship to limit gatherings by holding services online or in cars.
    Eric Gay / AP
    /
    A man prays while attending an Easter service at Trinity Baptist Church in San Antonio on April 12. Governors in many states have encouraged houses of worship to limit gatherings by holding services online or in cars.

    Texas

  • Gov. Greg Abbot issued an executive order that directs Texans to minimize nonessential gatherings and in-person contact with people who are not in the same household, "except where necessary to provide or obtain essential services." These restrictions are set to last through April 30.
  • The order says people should "avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants, and food courts, or visiting gyms or massage parlors," but pickup and delivery food options are "highly encouraged."
  • The governor has announced 14-day self-quarantine orders for travelers from Tri-State airports in New York, New Jersey, or Connecticut, as well as from New Orleans, and those arriving by road from Louisiana.
  • People are instructed not to visit nursing homes, retirement or long-term-care facilities "unless to provide critical assistance."
  • Schools have been ordered to close through May 4.
  • Abbott announced that public safety employees who contract COVID-19 during the course of their employment will be reimbursed for reasonable medical expenses related to their treatment of COVID-19.
  • The state's Comfort Food Care Package program will provide meals for at-risk youth and families. Each package contains enough food from participating restaurants to feed a family of 5 to 6 and will be delivered to recipients' homes.
  • SNAP and Medicaid benefit renewals currently due will be renewed automatically.
  • Abbott has waived certain Housing and Urban Development requirements in order to use program funds for tenant rent relief.
  • All state parks and historic sites are closed.
  • Abbott temporarily waived a series of regulations in order to expand telehealth services.
  • Goldman Sachs, in partnership with the LiftFund and other community development financial institutions, is providing $50 million in loans to Texas small businesses that have been impacted by COVID-19.
  • Utah

  • On March 27, Gov. Gary Herbert issued a two-week "stay safe, stay home directive." It is not a shelter-in-place order, but instructs Utahns to stay home whenever possible. Herbert has extended the directive through May 1.
  • The governor ordered restaurants and bars to close until at least April 15, though takeout is allowed if the order is placed remotely.
  • Businesses are requested to encourage employees to telecommute.
  • Utah officials are requesting that people avoid social gatherings of more than 10 people.
  • State officials say that K-12 public schools will be dismissed until at least May 1.
  • The state health department restricted non-urgent medical, dental and veterinary procedures.
  • Herbert ordered a moratorium on residential evictions for certain tenants who have been directly impacted by COVID-19.
  • Beginning April 10, individuals 18 and older entering Utah as their final destination must sign an electronic travel declaration form. This order applies to motorists and people flying into Salt Lake City International Airport, and will remain in effect until May 2.
  • Herbert announced on April 9 that Utah's National Parks had closed to the public.
  • Vermont

  • Gov. Phil Scott issued a "Stay Home, Stay Safe" order effective March 25, which directs Vermonters to leave their residences only for essential reasons and to adhere to social distancing policies while in public. That order and all measures associated with the state of emergency have been extended through May 15.
  • All businesses and not-for-profit entities, unless exempted, must suspend in-person operations. Bars and restaurants may operate only for takeout or delivery.
  • The governor has restricted nonessential gatherings to 10 people or less.
  • All public and independent schools are closed for in-person instruction until the end of the academic year.
  • Scott issued an executive order on March 30 that directs residents and non-residents coming from outside the state for anything other than an essential purpose to home-quarantine for 14 days and strongly discourages travel to the state by people from COVID-19 "hot spots."
  • Lodging facilities – including hotels, motels, bed and breakfasts, short term rentals, Airbnbs, and all public and private camping facilities and RV parks – "are to be closed except for stated exemptions when supporting the state's COVID-19 response."
  • Scott announced on April 7 that he had submitted a letter to President Trump requesting federal disaster funds and the authority and funding to activate additional Vermont National Guard personnel.
  • State health officials are recommending Vermonters wear cloth face coverings when outside of the home.
  • Income tax filing due dates for state personal and corporate income tax have been moved to July 15.
  • Virginia

  • On March 30, Northam issued a statewide stay-at-home order, effective immediately, lasting until June 10.
  • The stay-at-home order says individuals may leave their residence for allowable travel, including to seek medical attention, work, care for family or household members, pick up groceries and prescriptions and engage in outdoor activity with strict social distancing requirements.
  • Only essential businesses are permitted to operate until at least April 23.Restaurants, bars and other dining services may offer delivery and takeout.
  • Northam recommended Virginians wear cloth face coverings when out in public. While wearing face coverings is technically illegal in the state, Northam said at an April 6 press briefing that "no citations will be written for wearing protective masks."
  • All K-12 schools are closed until the end of the academic year.
  • Northam announced that the Department of Education's online learning system, "Virtual Virginia," has been expanded to enable all public school teachers to host virtual classes through June 30.
  • To conserve personal protective equipment, all hospitals have been directed to stop performing elective surgeries or procedures.
  • Northam moved the state's primary elections from June 9 to June 23. He has asked the General Assembly to postpone the May General Election and special elections, initially set for May 5, to November 3.
  • Indoor and outdoor gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited.
  • A U.S. service member helps set up a mobile surgical unit as part of a field hospital in March in Seattle. Washington, one of the first states to report confirmed cases of the coronavirus, was also one of the first to issue a sweeping stay-at-home directive.
    Elaine Thompson / AP
    /
    A U.S. service member helps set up a mobile surgical unit as part of a field hospital in March in Seattle. Washington, one of the first states to report confirmed cases of the coronavirus, was also one of the first to issue a sweeping stay-at-home directive.

    Washington

  • On March 23, Gov. Jay Inslee issued an order requiring "every Washingtonian to stay home unless they need to pursue an essential activity." The "Stay Home, Stay Healthy" order also closes all nonessential businesses and bans all gatherings for "social, spiritual and recreational purposes." It has been extended through May 4.
  • All gatherings for "social, spiritual and recreational purposes" have been banned.
  • All K-12 public and private schools in the state will remain closed through the remainder of the 2019-2020 academic year.
  • School facilities may still be used for necessary in-person services like preparation of food service and child care, provided they follow public health guidelines.
  • The state has created a grant fund for small businesses, using a portion of the state's Strategic Reserve Fund.
  • Inslee, in partnership with nonprofits and local philanthropies, announced the launch of the WA Food Fund on April 7. The relief fund will work to meet increasingly high demand at food banks across the state.
  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington announced the Western States Pact on April 13. The framework offers principles and goals for a shared approach to reopening states' economies.
  • Inslee announced on April 13 that the Department of Corrections would implement strategies for reducing the state's prison population, starting by focusing on the early release of vulnerable individuals through commutation and modified reentry programs.
  • Inslee issued a proclamation extending certain rights and safeguards to high-risk workers so that they can protect themselves against COVID-19 without jeopardizing their employment status.
  • West Virginia

  • Gov. Jim Justice issued a stay-at-home order, "directing all West Virginia residents to stay at home and limit movements outside of their homes beyond essential needs." The order will remain in place indefinitely.
  • The order allows people to pick up essentials such as groceries and medicine; people can also exercise outside while maintaining a 6-foot distance from each other and "care for or support a friend or family member."
  • Justice is directing people not to visit loved ones in hospitals or nursing homes.
  • All pre-K through 12th grade schools in the state are closed until April 20. All child care sites except those serving parents working in "essential" jobs are ordered closed.
  • Justice announced a month of free fishing for state residents, waiving the requirement for a fishing license to fish in state-regulated waters. Anglers must practice social distancing.
  • The governor issued an executive order on March 30 requiring travelers from area "with substantial community spread" to quarantine for 14 days. He also closed state park campgrounds.
  • The state has delayed primary elections , moving them from May 12 to June 9.
  • President Trump granted Justice's request for a major disaster declaration for the state on April 3, making available federal funding for emergency protective measures.
  • Justice issued an executive order requiring that all private and public golf courses follow proper cleaning protocols and enforce social distancing measures, including limiting one individual per golf cart for people who don't live together.
  • Every West Virginia county will receive a $100,000 grant for purposes of awarding "hero pay" to first responders and front line personnel.
  • The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources will issue a one-time $500 payment to current recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.
  • Wisconsin

  • State authorities issued a stay-at-home order effective through April 24.
  • The order is punishable by up to 30 days imprisonment or a fine of up to $250 or both.
  • Gatherings of 10 or more people are prohibited.
  • Schools will be closed "for the duration of the public health emergency."
  • Evictions and foreclosures in the state were ordered suspended on March 27. Certain licensing requirements for health care workers were also suspended.
  • Two state-operated voluntary self-isolation facilities will open in Madison and Milwaukee.
  • Gov. Tony Evers issued an executive order on April 6, a day before the state's primary election was set to take place, delaying in-person voting to June 9.State Republicans immediately challenged it in Wisconsin Supreme Court, which blocked the delay.That night, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the state could not accept absentee ballots postmarked after its voting day, reversing a lower court decision that would have given Wisconsinites six extra days to vote by mail.
  • While religious institutions are considered essential under the stay-at-home order, they must still abide by the 10-person limit. Evers issued guidance encouraging houses of worship to conduct services online, in parking lots with congregants in their cars, or shifts of small groups.
  • The Department of Natural Resources closed 40 state parks, forests and recreational areas "until further notice."
  • The state is seeking active and retired health care professionals, as well as individuals who wish to help in non-clinical support positions, to volunteer for the new Wisconsin Emergency Assistance Volunteer Registry.
  • Wyoming

  • Wyoming has not enacted a statewide stay-at-home order, though Gov. Mark Gordon issued a plea on March 25 for "citizens to stay home whenever possible, only going out when absolutely necessary."
  • Wyoming Department of Health issued an order to close restaurants and bars, except for takeout, along with theaters, gyms, child care facilities, K-12 schools, colleges, universities and trade schools in the state.
  • Gatherings of 10 people or more in a single room or confined space, including outdoors, are prohibited.
  • Camping facilities in state parks have been closed until further notice.
  • On April 3, Gordon extended existing statewide health orders through April 30, and issued a directive requiring any individual entering Wyoming from outside of the state to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Gordon has requested a major disaster declaration from the federal government.
  • Wyoming Democrats will be conducting their presidential preference caucus entirely by mail. Voters must have registered Democrat by March 20 to be eligible, and ballots must be received by April 17.
  • This is a developing story. We will continue to update as new information becomes available.

    NPR's Brakkton Booker, Merrit Kennedy, Vanessa Romo, Colin Dwyer, Laurel Wamsley, Aubri Juhasz and Bobby Allyn contributed to this report.

    Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

    Corrected: April 8, 2020 at 9:00 PM PDT
    A previous version of this story said Missouri's governor issued a statewide stay-at-home order effective April 24. In fact, the order is effective until April 24.
    Corrected: April 8, 2020 at 9:00 PM PDT
    A previous version of this story said Missouri's governor issued a statewide stay-at-home order effective April 24. In fact, the order is effective until April 24.
    Rachel Treisman
    Rachel Treisman (she/her) is a writer and editor for the Morning Edition live blog, which she helped launch in early 2021.