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Check here for information on fires in our region. You can also check out these resources:Northwest Interagency Coordination CenterSWOFIRE: Oregon Department of Forestry, SW regionCalFire: Current Fire InformationInciWeb: Incident Information SystemOregon Smoke Blog: Smoke informationSouth Central Oregon Fire Management Cooperative (Klamath/Lake Counties & Crater Lake)

Stouts Fire Burn-out Operation Will Be "A Slow, Steady Process."

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Stouts Fire Facebook page
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UPDATE: SATURDAY, AUGUST 15, 4:30 P.M. ... Burnout operations began yesterday on the Stouts fire with a small section of line along the southeastern portion of the fire line, along Forest Service Road 3201, one-half mile northwest of Diamond Rock. 

The Stouts Creek Fire Incident Management Team is hosting a public meeting today at 6:30 p.m. at the Azalea Community Church, 362 Upper Cow Creek Road, Azalea, Oregon. Fire managers will present the plan for the burnout and contingency plans for structure protection.

The fire is 24,389 acres and 67% contained. 

The burn plan has been developed during the past several days and has been deemed the safest and quickest way for crews to complete the last section of line on the Stouts Fire. 

The goal of the burn is to first solidify the perimeter then continue ignition to remove unburned fuels. By burning against the wind and using topography in their favor, crews will be able to bring the fire along safely and at a pace that will not damage the resource. The total burnout will take several days and depend heavily on weather conditions.

“The next couple of days are going to be big for everybody,” said John Pellissier, Operations Chief for fire. “All of the weather conditions and other factors have to be right. We are looking to start slow and this will take several days. It will be a slow, steady process.”

There still is a sizeable amount of unburned fuel that needs to be removed within the burn area but significant smoke is not expected Saturday. Smoke might be more noticeable in the coming days depending on wind and could persist until the burnout is completed. Crews are making steady progress along the remaining portions of the fire line, continuing to mop up and patrol up to 300 feet inside the line.

The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $27 million.

UPDATE: FRIDAY, AUGUST 14, 9:15 A.M. ... Night crews on the Stouts Creek Fire held and widened control lines while working toward securing the south end of the fire.

Overnight fire activity was low as firefighters patrolled the northern portions of the 24,181-acre fire looking for hot spots and flare ups.

The fire is 65% contained.

Using heavy equipment, crews have completed the majority of the containment line on the south end in preparation for the large burn-out, north of Upper Cow Creek Road and Beaver Creek. Firefighters will install hoses, pumps and tanks as mangers wait for favorable conditions to complete the next phase. Based on current progress and weather forecasts, that burn-out could begin in the next few days.

“We should have the line completed today,” said John Pellissier, Operations Chief for the fire. “We’re about 2/3 done with the mechanical work and then we’ll run hose and water sources throughout. Operationally, we’ll be ready. Then it’s up to Mother Nature.”

Fire managers are looking for weather conditions that will allow for a safe, slow burn that will minimize impact on timber and other natural resources. If any of the many factors aren't right, the burn could be delayed

“All of the weather conditions and other factors have to be right,” Pellissier said. “We are looking to start with a smaller, slow trial process and this could take several days. It will be a slow, steady process.”

There will be an important public meeting Saturday night at the Azalea Community Church at 6:30 pm.  The topic is the burnout on the southern end of the Stouts Creek Fire. 

There are 1,645 personnel assigned to the fire with 49 crews, 46 engines, 27 water tenders, 20 bulldozers and 11 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to fires with greater needs.

The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $25.5 million.

UPDATE: THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 10:00 A.M. ... Firefighters on the Stouts fire east of Canyonville in Douglas County spent yesterday conducting burnout operations and prepared other areas for future burnouts, particularly north of Upper Cow Creek Road and Beaver Creek.

The fire stands at 23,841 acres, with 63 percent containment.

One of the last small areas to be burned out in the Upper Cow Creek area was successfully completed last night. Mop-up is underway in that area while much of the north end of the fire has almost completed mop-up. Mop-up means fire fighters walk the fire line, sometimes using handheld infrared devices, and ensure that no heat or smoke is visible for several hundred feet inside.

Mop-up also continues along some sections of the southeast, south and southwest flanks.

Operations managers report that there are still those areas with large, burning trees inside the line that, with a bit of wind, higher temperatures and dry receptive fuels could carry fire outside containment lines.

“I think the message that we got with yesterday’s unexpected critical fire weather,” says Deputy Incident Commander Russ Lane, “is that, despite the success we’ve had, this is still a big fire with a lot of life and potential in it. We will continue to be vigilant, holding and widening the lines we have while we work to wrap up the south end."

The weather is expected to continue to be hot and dry again today which will increase fire behavior.

There is still a large burnout needed on the south end of the fire, north of Upper Cow Creek Road and Beaver Creek. Prep work along roads in the area continues as firefighters wait for the right conditions to complete that operation.

There currently are 1,560 personnel assigned to the fire with 56 crews, 46 engines, 30 water tenders, 21 bulldozers and 10 helicopters. Numbers of personnel and equipment will continue to shrink as objectives are met and these resources move on to fires with greater needs.

The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $22.4 million.

UPDATE: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 12, 9:30 A.M. ...  There still is a large active component to the Stouts Creek Fire, burning for two weeks now in Douglas County, east of Canyonville. But many portions of the fire are now in mop-up mode.

Firefighting crews are using handheld infrared devices to seek out and extinguish small pockets of heat that could become problematic if left to smolder. Fire officials say there's still is a long way to go before the effort is complete but progress is being made every day.

The fire now stands at 23,589 acres, with 56 percent containment.

Progress on the Stouts Creek fire lines steadily continues. Hand crews and heavy equipment continue to build and strengthen these lines, concentrating particular efforts on portions of the fire line closest to Drew, and the lower eastern and southern flanks of the fire’s perimeter where the fire is still active.

Last night’s burnout operations were cut short because fuels were too wet to readily burn. Relative humidity across the fire was the highest since the fire started, in some areas up to 70 percent. The moderate weather over the fire area the past several days, while reducing undesired fire activity, has also reduced firefighters’ ability to perform advantageous burnouts. Growth of the fire’s size is expected to increase little in the next 24 hours.

Firefighters along the southwestern edge of the fire – north of Upper Cow Creek Road and Beaver Creek – are gearing up for a burnout operation to help complete and strengthen fire line.

“This is a fairly substantial operation in difficult terrain and fuels,” said Deputy Incident Commander Russ Lane. “Completing this task is key to closing the door on this fire.”

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Relative humidity is forecast to be lower than yesterday with more fire activity but also allow for better burning operations.

All evacuation levels remain at Level I (READY).

There currently are 1,693 personnel assigned to the fire with 62 crews, 53 engines, 30 water tenders, 23 bulldozers and 16 helicopters.

The Stouts Creek Fire costs to date are $22.4 million.

UPDATE: TUESDAY, AUGUST 11, 10:15 A.M. ... The burned area in the Stouts fire has increased since yesterday, but mostly because of burn-out operations conducted by fire crews to bring burned areas to the constructed fire lines around the perimeter. Almost 50% of the Stout’s Creek fire perimeter is now considered as a secured fire line. Current fire size is 23,388 acres.

In other encouraging news,  the evacuation level around the community of Drew between mileposts 28-39 was lowered to a Level I (READY) as of Monday evening.

Today, the weather is expected to be moderate and good progress on the fire is expected from the 1,900 firefighters now assigned to the fire.  On the sides of the fire bordering Milo, Tiller, and Drew mop-up operations will continue. North of Upper Cow Creek Road the possibility of burnout operations will be evaluated, otherwise firefighters will continue to prepare the fire lines for a future burnout.

Heavy equipment is in use along Forest Road 3201 and all non-essential traffic is requested to avoid this area.  All county roads are open within the fire vicinity, but caution is advised as fire suppression traffic is heavy.

With continued smoke in the area, those with health concerns should talk to their doctor or go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com where there is information on wildfires and health as well as access to AQI monitors. Motorists are urged to be careful driving through smoke on the roads, and turn on their low beam headlights. Residents and travelers also are asked to not stop along Tiller-Trail Highway to view fire or helicopter activity as traffic is heavy with response vehicles.

The Stouts Creek fire costs to date are $19.4 million.

UPDATE: MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 9:50 A.M. ... Fire fighters reported a good day on the Stouts fire yesterday. Crews made significant headway connecting the Stouts Creek Fire’s control lines Sunday night, burning out an area along the fire’s north and east sides along Hatchet Creek. Other crews along the Tiller-Trail Highway from milepost 30 to 35 walked the fire down to the control lines.

The fire has now burned 23,014 acres and is 40 percent contained.

Type 2 Initial Attack crews from Oregon, Massachusetts, Ohio and West Virginia with expertise conducting burnout operations and falling large trees arrived Sunday night. These crews are heading to the fire line today for operations the south and east sides of the fire. The Santa Fe Hot Shots will attempt a burnout operation about one mile north of Cow Creek Road near Beaver Creek.

Today’s work will focus on strengthening lines along the southern part of the fire to prepare for a large burn. Forest Roads 32, 3201 and 3230 would be used to hold a fairly large burnout planned for next week.

Evacuation levels remain unchanged. Drew is the only area on evacuation Level 2 (SET)  from milepost 28 through milepost 39. The Douglas County Sheriff’s office is monitoring that designation.

The Incident Meteorologist reported a Red Flag Warning (hot, dry, windy weather conducive to wildfire) because of lightning potential which might be accompanied by rain, wind gusts and hail during the next 24 hours. He called for wind shifts from the south and southeast this morning to the west and northwest this afternoon. 

The fire has been producing heavy smoke, and as crews continue conducting burns over the next few days and weeks to contain the fire, residents will see more smoke.Those with health concerns should talk to their doctor or go to www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com where there is information on wildfires and health as well as access to AQI monitors. Motorists are urged to be careful driving through smoke on the roads, and turn on their low beam headlights. Residents and travelers also are asked to not stop along Tiller-Trail Highway to view fire or helicopter activity as traffic is heavy with response vehicles.

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UPDATE: SUNDAY, AUGUST 9, 11:15 A.M. ... Firefighters made significant progress on the 22,500-acre Stouts Creek Fire this weekend, while their efforts added to very smoky conditions in Douglas County.

Containment increased to 35 percent and the number of structures threatened decreased from more than 300, to 163 tallied on Sunday.

Burnout operations along Hatchet Creek continued Sunday, as crews worked to strengthen lines along the fire’s southern edge. Much of the remaining perimeter is being mopped up.

The alignment of westerly winds pushed more smoke into the areas of Milo and Tiller, while possibly clearing the air a bit for residents along Upper Cow Creek Road.

Burnouts made it a lot smokier for drivers along the Tiller-Trail Highway. And the 18 helicopters mobilized to fight the fire attracted attention from the roadway, as onlookers further congested traffic in the area. 

There are now 1,628 people – 62 crews, 47 engines, 28 water tenders and 27 bulldozers – working on the fire, which agencies say has reached a cost of $16.8 million. About 53 percent of the fire is on state protected, BLM and private lands, and 47 percent in the Umpqua National Forest.

Firefighting agencies have called a public meeting at the Milo Volunteer Fire Department, 7 p.m. on Sunday.

UPDATE: SATURDAY, AUGUST 8, 6:00 P.M. ... Several areas of the 21,900-acre Stouts Fire are in the mop up stages, with overall containment increasing to 30 percent. The fire is most active along the northeast and southeast edges of the perimeter. Smoke and flames can be glimpsed on the ridge top above Tiller-Trail Highway.

The Upper Cow Creek Road and Milo area, as well as a small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County, are under a Level 1 (Ready) evacuation alert. Drew (milepost 28 to 39) remains at Level 2 (Set). 

Structure protection teams demobilized today after determining that threatened homes were safeguarded by defensible space, fuel chipping, strategic placement of portable water tanks and pumps, and the installation of sprinkler kits. Douglas County firefighters remain on call to respond to structure fires.

Agencies report that more than 1,500 people have been assigned to this suppression effort since the fire broke out July 30, at a cost so far of $12.1 million. 

UPDATE: FRIDAY, AUGUST 7, 11:15 P.M. ... Night crews continued to work on the flare-up of the east flank of the Stouts Creek Fire. The fire actively burned in this area till 3:00 am.  Crews were able to maintain the fire within the constructed hand dug lines. 

Fire activity around the rest of the 20,804-acre Stouts Creek Fire was relatively calm overnight.

The fire is now 25 percent contained. 

Fire line construction continued along the lower portion of the west flank, the south flank and portions of the east flank. Heavy equipment used includes bulldozers, excavators and feller-bunchers. The equipment is not only building a wide fire line but is removing excess trees and brush adjacent to the line. Where the heavy equipment cannot work, due to steep terrain, fire crews are building fire line by hand.

A structure protection task force, comprised of engines’ protected homes near the community of Drew. A second task force of engines from structural protection fire districts in Jackson County arrived last night to provide additional structure protection.  Both task forces are working a flex schedule to maximize protection during the afternoon and evening burning periods.

The evacuation levels in the Upper Cow Creek Road area, Milo and Drew remained at Level 2 (Set). A small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County is under a Level 1 (Ready) evacuation alert.

1,545 personnel are assigned to the fire suppression effort.

The cost of suppression so far is $10.4 million.

Smoke will continue to drift from the fire area and will be stronger when burnout operations are taking place. Most of the smoke will drift in a south/southeast direction from the fire. For updates on smoke density and public health advisories, seewww.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com

 

UPDATE: THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 10:30 A.M. ... Working together through the night, wildland firefighters from 17 states continued carving out control lines and doing some controlled burn outs on the Stouts fire, burning east of Canyonville, Oregon.

The fire grew about 4,000 acres over the last three days to 19,971 acres. The fire is 20 percent contained. 

One evacuation notice has been reduced from Level 2 (Set) to Level 1 (Ready).

Today, crews’ fire suppression efforts will focus on connecting and widening existing fire lines. If conditions are favorable, more burn out operations may be done on the east and south flanks. Crews on the fire’s west and north flanks are running hose lays and doing mop-up along the fire’s edge.

While crews dig lines, eight helicopters will continue supporting them by dropping thousands of gallons of water to calm fires threatening existing lines and spot fires. Another helicopter is on standby to respond to medical emergencies. Air tankers are available on an as-needed basis.

1,400 people are working on the firefighting team. 

A structural protection task force continues monitoring the Drew area. Residences and other structures have been evaluated for defensible space. Crews reduced shrubs, brush, and other vegetation to make homes more defensible against fire. Crews strategically placed portable water ponds, pumps, hoses and sprinklers among the homes as a contingency measure.

The Douglas County Sheriff’s office has reduced to Level 1 (Ready) evacuation status the areas of Milo Academy, Stouts Creek Road, Ferguson Lane and Conley Road. The evacuation levels in the Upper Cow Creek Road and Drew remain at Level 2 (Set). A small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County is under a Level 1 evacuation alert.

UPDATE: WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5, 10:45 A.M. ... Fire crews made good progress on the Stouts fire near Canyonville Tuesday, running hoses down the miles-long western flank of the fire. Mop-up was also underway in that part of the fire. Connecting fire lines and performing more burn-out operations is expected to be the main order of business today.

The fire has grown to 17,500 acres. Most of the increased size is due to fireline relocation and burnout operations. The fire is 15 percent contained.

Burn-outs are being done along the fire's east and south flanks. Crews on the fire’s west and north flanks are running hose lays and doing mop-up along the fire’s edge. Some burnout operations are also being conducted along the west side.

Helicopters will be seen much of the day over the Stouts Creek Fire because the smoke has cleared out allowing the aircraft to fly earlier than normal. Seven helicopters are assigned to the incident for fire suppression support. Another helicopter is on standby to respond to medical emergencies. Air tankers are available on an as-needed basis.

The evacuation levels in the Upper Cow Creek Road area, Milo and Drew remained at Level 2 (Set). A small area along the Tiller-Trail Highway north of Trail in Jackson County is under a Level 1 (Ready) evacuation alert.

A task force of structural fire protection engines is in place in the Upper Cow Creek Road area and another task force is stationed in the Drew area. Residences and other structures have been evaluated for defensible space. Vegetation reduction has been completed in many areas to make homes more defensible against fire. Portable water ponds, pumps, hoses and sprinklers have been stationed in several areas among the homes.

Smoke continues to drift from the fire area and will be stronger when burnout operations are taking place. Most of the smoke will drift in a south/southeast direction from the fire. For updates on smoke density and public health advisories, see www.oregonsmoke.blogspot.com.

UPDATE: TUESDAY, AUGUST 4, 10:00 A.M. ... On Monday, firefighters took advantage of favorable weather conditions by constructing fire lines and conducting burn out operations on the Stouts fire, burning east of Canyonville in Douglas County.  Fire officials stated that four or five more days as productive as yesterday will make the difference.

The fire increased to 17,166 acres as crews burned out vegetation to help protect a communications site and reinforce dozer and hand lines. Monday night, crews were able to put in more miles of line than expected.

The fire is 10% contained with 1,272 people working on this incident representing multiple local, state, and federal natural resource and fire service agencies. 

The weather forecast projects continued favorable conditions that should help firefighters make gains on containing the fire. Smoke and flames from burn out operations are expected to be visible from Tiller and Drew areas.

A smoke inversion -- which keeps smoke close to the ground and hinders aerial firefighting operations --- has been a regular occurrence on this incident. The inversion is expected to lift by mid-day, making additional air support available to firefighters.

Structural firefighters are providing “point-protection” as needed around residences adjacent to the fire.

All evacuation orders remain in effect; there are no new evacuation orders.

 
UPDATE: MONDAY, AUGUST 3, 9:45 A.M. ... Firefighters working the Stouts fire Sunday took advantage of the lower temperatures, higher humidity, cloud cover, and smoke inversion to build additional fire line, prepare contingency lines, and assess the areas around structures that need clearing. Crews are starting work to help protect those homes if the fire moves that way.

The fire -- burning east of Canyonville near Milo in Douglas County -- grew slightly Sunday but remains just over 15,200 acres. Containment is estimated at 5 percent.

The Upper Cow Creek Road Level 3 (GO) evacuation notice was reduced to a Level 2 (SET), allowing residents to return home.

Because of the Governor's invocation last week of the Emergency Conflagration Act, hundreds of structural firefighters have joined the wildland firefighters to focus on protecting buildings, especially homes, in the threatened area. Monday, the wildland firefighters will start clearing road systems and constructing line along the east side of the fire, while the structural firefighters keep clearing the areas around homes to help prevent a wildfire from harming them. 

Currently, 317 structures are considered threatened. 

“The crews are doing an excellent job,” said Roseburg Resources Forestry Manager Mark Wall. “They are literally working night and day to get this thing under control. No doubt, this is a difficult job, but I’m confident it’ll get done as quickly as possible and most importantly, safely.”

The fire is burning approximately 1/3 on private land, 1/3 on Bureau of Land Management land, and 1/3 on National Forest land.

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Forest Service map of the emergency closure area surrounding the Stouts fire in Douglas County, Oregon, east of Canyonville.

Smoke remains heavy and has been flowing south  into the Rogue Valley and Upper Klamath Basin all weekend, causing poor air quality around the region. The smoke is expected to start lifting around noon. 

EVACUATIONS

* Evacuation Level 1 (READY) is in place for the Milo Academy area and three residence along the Tiller Trail Highway in Jackson County. 

* Level 2 (SET) evacuations are in place along the Upper Cow Creek Road on the south side of the fire; Ferguson, Stouts Creek, and Conley lanes on the north side; and the Drew Valley along the Tiller Trail Highway from milepost 28 to 39 on the east side. 

* No Level 3 (GO) evacuations are in place at this time.

The Red Cross evacuation shelter remains at the Canyonville YMCA.

UPDATE: SUNDAY, AUGUST 2, 10:30 A.M. ... Firefighters continued to deal with extreme weather conditions on the Stouts Fire yesterday, as high temperatures, low humidity, and low fuel moistures combined to make a difficult day on the ground.

Wind gusts of 10-20 miles per hour and temperatures over 100 degrees were observed. The fire has now burned more than 15,000 acres, growing well over 6,000 acres since Saturday morning.

The fire pushed east and turned northeast on Saturday. An additional level 2 evacuation notice was issued to the Drew area east of the fire.

“You’ve heard it already – ‘bring your A-game,’” Incident Commander John Buckman reiterated to the crews at a Saturday evening briefing. “You’re going to need it for at least a few solid days for us to get well-positioned. This is a tough fire and we’ll be at it for a while.”

Two task forces continued to work in the Upper Cow Creek evacuation area yesterday in anticipation of the fire reaching that area. A task force consists of different size engines and water tenders with 3-4 firefighters per engine. Residents’ work on reducing fuels around many of the structures over the last couple of years was evident and will hopefully give them the upper edge if the fire moves through the area.

A third task force moved to the Drew community to survey the homes because the fire has been moving that direction. Wildland firefighters continue building control lines between the fire and the community, but the terrain is steep and the heavy fuel load is proving difficult, so contingency plans to protect the community are being developed.

Sunday’s forecast of possible lightning could complicate this already difficult fire. About 400 structural and wildland firefighters are working the day shift with landowners and companies, while another 400 are scheduled for the night shift.

A community meeting in Azalea on Saturday night drew an audience of 177 people.

Another public meeting is being held at the Milo Fire Department Sunday evening at 6:30 pm.

The Oregon State Fire Marshal Green Team, Oregon Department of Forestry Team 1, Roseburg Resources and other landowners, and structural fire protection teams from Clackamas, Lane, Linn/Benton, Lincoln, Marion and Yamhill counties are working with dozens of private contract crews on the Stouts Fire. Over 1000 people are currently assigned to the fire.

Evacuations Levels 1 to 3 have been issued which affect 188 homes.

* Evacuation Level 1 (Ready) is in place for the Milo Academy area.

* Level 2 (Set) evacuations are in place near the Galesville Dam up to Snow Creek on the south side of the fire; Ferguson, Stouts Creek, and Conley lanes on the north side; and Trail Highway in Tiller on the east side.

* Level 3 (Go) evacuations are in place for residents in theAzalea area from Upper Cow Creek to Snow Creek East. The Red Cross set up an evacuation shelter
at the Canyonville YMCA.

Public Information Phone: (541) 825-3724 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.) 

Email: StoutsFire@gmail.com
http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/ 
@StoutsFire
www.facebook.com/StoutsFire 
#StoutsFire

UPDATE: SATURDAY, AUGUST 1, 11:50 a.m. ... Historically high temperatures and low relative humidity has led to quick growth of the Stouts fire since its start on July 30. The fire has grown to about 8,500 acres as of Saturday morning.

Between yesterday and last night the fire grew 2,000 acres to the south and east. Varying levels of evacuation warnings are in effect for several nearby areas.

“This is a tough fire,” ODF Team 1 Incident Commander John Buckman explained this morning. “Because of the challenging terrain and abundant, dry fuel – large standing and downed trees – we have difficult work ahead to suppress this fire but I know these crews can do it.”

Yesterday, the Douglas County Sheriff's Office issued a Level 3 (Go) evacuation for residents in the Azalea area from Upper Cow Creek to Snow Creek East. There is a Level 2 (Set) evacuation for residents near the Galesville Dam up to Snow Creek. For the residents on Ferguson Lane, Stouts Creek, and Conley Lane - the level of evacuation was reduced to Level 2. 

The Red Cross set up an evacuation shelter at the Canyonville YMCA. 

Fire managers and structure protection teams continue evaluating the wildland-urban interface zones and preparing the areas to help blunt the fire if it reaches these areas. This includes the Milo, Tiller, Azalea, and Crew communities, in addition to the homes under Level II and III evacuations.

The combined structural and wildland firefighting team of over 800 firefighters will split responsibilities based on their expertise. The Oregon State Fire Marshal's Green Team’s and Oregon Department of Forestry Team I are operating under a “unified command” to coordinate the structural and wildland firefighting efforts. 

While the city or structural firefighters work with homeowners to help prevent harm to their homes if the fire reaches them, the wildland firefighters will continue working to contain the fire to prevent the fire from spreading to the neighborhoods.

Governor Kate Brown invoked the Conflagration Act to bring structural firefighters in from around the state to help protect the neighborhoods close to the fire. The OSFM Office quickly mobilized statewide resources including task force teams from Clackamas, Lane, Linn/Benton, Lincoln, Marion and Yamhill counties to work with the Green Team.

More Information: (541) 621-4156 (7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)         #StoutsFire    StoutsFire@gmail.com 

http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/

www.facebook.com/oregondepartmentofforestry                                   www.twitter.com/ORDeptForestry

www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation                      www.twitter.com/DouglasFPA

UPDATE: FRIDAY, JULY 31, 9:50 A.M. … Fueled by tinder-dry forests and extreme high temperatures, the Stouts fire in Douglas County, 11 miles east of Canyonville, actively burned late into the night, throwing up a smoke column that could be seen from as far away as the Rogue Valley. 

Oregon Governor Kate Brown last night invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act for the Stouts fire. The Governor’s declaration authorizes the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal to mobilize structural firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.
 

The fire exhibited extreme fire behavior yesterday afternoon and evening, rapidly growing from several hundred acres to 6,000 by last night. The fire quickly moved in a southeast direction from the point of origin before lying down in the early morning hours.  Firefighters assigned to the fire last night focused their efforts on opening access roads to the fire and anchoring into the heel of the fire to begin constructing fire line.  

About 450 firefighters are on scene of the Stouts Fire today and will continue working where night shift left off.  Fire activity is expected to increase throughout the day today as hot, dry weather is once again forecasted for the area.  Due to predicted weather conditions, the National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning for the Umpqua Basin. A Rad Flag Warning means high temperatures, low humidity and wind; conditions conducive to the starting and spread of wildfires.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

Thursday night, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office issued a Level 3 (GO) evacuation notice for homes on Stouts Creek Road, Ferguson Lane, and Conley Lane.  

A Level 1 (READY) evacuation notice was issued for all homes on Upper Cow Creek, east of Snow Creek Road.  

A Red Cross Shelter was opened at the Canyonville Elementary School, located at 124 N. Main Street in Canyonville.

The Oregon Department of Forestry Incident Management Team 1 arrived at the Stouts Fire Friday morning and has been briefed by the Douglas Forest Protective Association.  ODFIMT 1 is scheduled to assume command of the fire later this morning.  The Incident Command Post for the Stouts Fire will be located at Days Creek Charter School.

An Inciweb site has been created for the Stouts Fire:  http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4426/

Information about the Stouts Fire will also be posted to DFPA’s social media accounts.

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/DouglasForestProtectiveAssociation

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/douglasfpa

ORIGINAL POST: THURSDAY, JULY 30, 5:23 P.M. ... The Stouts Fire was reported Thursday burning 11 miles east of Canyonville near the community of Milo in Douglas County. 

The fire is exhibiting extreme behavior and growing rapidly. It was reported at 600 acres at 5:00 p.m. Thursday.

An Oregon Department of Forestry fire team has been sent to manage the fast-moving blaze. Firefighters and equipment from the Douglas Forest Protective Association and local fire departments are on scene. 

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office has issued a Level 3 "GO" evacuation order for the homes on Ferguson Lane, Stouts Creek, and Conley Lane. 

The ODF fire team will assume command of the operation Friday.

Cause of the fire is under investigation.