Underground History

Underground History is a regular segment of The Jefferson Exchange where we dust off the history right under our noses, and our feet, with Mark Tveskov and Chelsea Rose of the Southern Oregon University Anthropology Lab.

The Bracero Program started in 1942 and brought millions of Mexican guest workers, this man among them, to the United States.
Southern Oregon Historical Society

Join Jefferson Exchange host Geoffrey Riley and Chelsea Rose from SOU’s Laboratory of Anthropology for the next edition of Underground History Live, Monday, June 17 from 6 – 8 pm at Los Arcos Taqueria & Restaurant in Medford.

This edition of Underground History Live welcomes historian Madelina Cordia to discuss the the history of the Bracero Program in Oregon. This program, initiated during World War II, brought millions of guest workers from Mexico to the United States. 

Portland State University

It's not every day we get to witness archaeology in action.  But Portland State University offers the Archaeology Roadshow, a one-day event with examples of archaeology and the discoveries it makes. 

This year the Roadshow, in addition to its Portland event on June 1st, makes June stops in Central Oregon and in Burns, in the eastern part of the state. 

So guess what we talk about in this month's edition of Underground History, our monthly visit with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology

Andrew J. Russell/Public Domain

We have several big anniversaries this year: 350 years since the first Africans arrived in what became the United States.  50 years since humans arrived on the moon. 

And in between them, timewise, the ability of humans to travel from coast to coast by rail.  May 10th is the 150th anniversary of the driving of the golden spike in Utah, completing the transcontinental railroad. 

Now you know the subject of this month's Underground History, our regular confab with the archaeologists of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of AnthropologyUtah State Archaeologist Christopher Merritt pays a visit to talk about Promontory Summit and the spike. 

Southern Oregon Historical Society

Happy Birthday to Peter Britt!  The pioneer Oregon photographer was born in Switzerland in March 1819, 200 years ago. 

Britt and his vast body of work is the subject of this month's Underground History, our regular venture with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology.  Mark Tveskov and Chelsea Rose of SOULA return, with special guest Tom Robinson, a historian of Oregon photography. 

Wikimedia

The advances in technology mean practices in archaeology are evolving.  It also means the methods to communicate the results of archaeology are broader than they used to be. 

In this month's edition of Underground History, we meet Chris Matthews, who edits Historical Archaeology, the journal of the Society for Historical Archaeology.  He and Lynn Hunter Gamble talk about the changing world of archaeological journals. 

Canine Recovery Team

Archaeology tends to deal with events in the remote past.  But it also has value in the present; people with skills digging carefully in the ground have proven helpful in disaster situations. 

Like the deadly fires in California, where archaeologists and canine forensic units have helped recover human cremains.  Not people who died in the fire, but people already cremated whose families still had their ashes. 

That process--dogs and people--is the focus of this month's edition of Underground History, with our partners at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology

Guests are Lynne Engelbert of the Institute for Canine Forensics and Mike Newland at Environmental Science Associates

Underground History Live: Trapping Bigfoot!

Jan 4, 2019

Underground History is one of The Jefferson Exchange's most popular segments.

But why just listen on the radio? We're bringing Underground History above ground with Underground History Live!

Join Jefferson Exchange host Geoffrey Riley and Chelsea Rose and Mark Tveskov from SOU's Anthropology Lab at The Haul in Grants Pass for our next Underground History Live. It happens Monday, January 28 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm.

East Carolina University/Jon Carpenter

Our regular archaeology segment, Underground History, branches out a bit this month. 

Consider this the first edition of its alternate: Underwater History.  Because we meet Jennifer McKinnon from East Carolina University, a specialist in underwater archaeology, like on World War II battle sites in the Pacific. 

City of Salem

Dig in the ground in places where people live and hang out, and you're going to find evidence of people from the past.  That's why any excavation on public land usually requires an archaeologist to check out the area and see what's buried in the dirt. 

Our monthly Underground History segment on archaeology returns with news of a dig in Oregon's capital city.  The construction of a new police station in Salem brought out the archaeologists and students and volunteers as well. 

Kimberli Fitzgerald is the staff archaeologist for the city. 

Northwest Public Broadcasting

We talk about a fair amount of history, but it's SOULA that really makes "Underground History" possible. 

SOULA is the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, our partner organization for our monthly chats about archaeology. 

SOULA celebrates 20 years of existence this year.  Underground History regulars Chelsea Rose and Mark Tveskov return to talk about their work. 

Underground History: Britt's Vineyards

Sep 26, 2018

"Call before you dig," says the standard warning from the utility companies.  That's usually about protecting people from digging into gas, electric, or water lines. 

But there's stuff in the ground we can learn from, too, and that's why the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology exists.  The SOULA crew of archaeologists is experienced at digging into the region's history, in a very literal sense. 

This month we welcome local author MJ Daspit, who's been researching the location of Peter Britt's early vineyards in Jacksonville. SOULA has conducted excavations at Britt's homestead that has uncovered grape seeds from the 1870s.

Underground History: Native Battle Sites

Aug 29, 2018
Southern Oregon University

Stories tall and short may be told of past events, but the ground generally does not lie.  And that's the appeal of archaeology: digging up the true story. 

Our partners at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology share stories of the trade every month in Underground History. 

This month, we talk about unearthing artifacts at the sites of battles between Native Americans and whites.  SOULA's Mark Tveskov has done much of this in our region, and he'll present a paper on a conference coming up at the Mashantucket Pequot Research Center in Connecticut. 

Underground History: Tribes Of Grand Ronde Open Museum

Jul 25, 2018
Michelle Alaimo/courtesy of Smoke Signals

The people who killed Native Americans and marched the survivors off to reservations had few qualms about taking their cultural artifacts as well.  Pieces of tribal history sit in museum displays all over the world. 

Now the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde in Oregon have their own place to display items from the ancestors, the Chachalu Museum.  It is the focus of this month's Underground History, our monthly partnership with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA)

Briece Edwards, who runs the Historic Preservation Office for the tribes, is our guest. 

 

Underground History is one of The Jefferson Exchange's most popular segments.

But why just listen on the radio? We're bringing Underground History above ground with Underground History Live!

Join Jefferson Exchange host Geoffrey Riley and Chelsea Rose from SOU's Anthropology Lab at The Bella Union in Jacksonville for our next Underground History Live. It happens Monday, August 6 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm.

© 2003 Samvado Gunnar Kossatz

The Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and his followers are gone from Oregon, but absolutely not forgotten.  The religious leader set up camp on a ranch in Wasco County in the early 80s, and captured attention and headlines and law enforcement scrutiny. 

What began as a "free love" movement turned darker, including attempts to kill key officials and members of the public. 

This month's edition of Underground History, our regular soiree with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, covers the after-the-fact investigation of Rajneeshpuram. 

Matthew Cowan of the Oregon Historical Society played a part in the creation of the recent Netflix documentary about the Rajneeshees. 

Dennis Griffin is the state archaelogist who did some work on the ranch. 

BLM/Public Domain

Few people had heard of fairy shrimp when they showed up in Jackson County 20 years ago.  Before that, the little critters were thought to be no closer than Mount Shasta. 

But they live in vernal pools, seasonal pools of water, in the Agate Desert around White City.  And they are listed as threatened, requiring some effort to protect them. 

This month's edition of Underground History, with our partners at the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, considers the shrimp... archaeologists have done some work exploring the areas where they live. 

Underground History: Balloon Bombs Remembered

Apr 25, 2018
Michael (a.k.a. moik) McCullough, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=58371763

The fears of a Japanese attack on the mainland United States actually came true during the second World War.  But no one knew it at the time. 

The discovery of a balloon bomb near Bly, Oregon in the spring of 1945 resulted in the deaths of six people. 

That case and others were kept under wraps by government censors at the time. 

Our Underground History segment with the archaeologists of the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA) focuses on the balloon bombings this month. 

The Waldo-Bogle family were early African-American residents of Oregon.
Oregon Historical Society

Underground History is one of The Jefferson Exchange's most popular segments.

But why just listen on the radio? We're bringing Underground History above ground with Underground History Live!

Join Jefferson Exchange host Geoffrey Riley and Chelsea Rose from SOU's Anthropology Lab at The Black Sheep Pub and Restaurant on the plaza in Ashland for our next Underground History Live. It happens Monday, April 30 from 6:00 - 8:00 pm.

bbcrc.org

Anybody who knows a thing or two about railroads in our region knows the significant of Black Butte. 

It's the junction south of Weed where the Siskiyou Line of the former Southern Pacific, the old main line, meets its successor, the Cascade route: the current main line. 

Seems like a good place for some kind of celebration of railroad history.  And it is, through the efforts of the Black Butte Center for Railroad Culture

It is not strictly a railroad museum, because it incorporates railroad literature and music and other aspects of railroad culture.  And it is the focus of this month's edition of Underground History, our regular confab with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology, SOULA. 

Oregon State Archives

Oregon remains one of the whitest states in the union, a legacy of the state's exclusion of all people of color upon entering the Union. 

But African-Americans have made significant contributions to the state throughout its history.  And those contributions are recognized in the first-ever Black History Month observance at the Oregon State Archives. 

"Black in Oregon, 1840-1870" is now on display, and it is the subject of this month's edition of Underground History. 

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