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Missed The Great Oregon Shakeout? Here's What You Need To Know

<p><span style="line-height: 22.1000003814697px;">A student at Creston Elementary School hides under his desk during "The Great Oregon Shakeout" on Thursday, October 16, 2014.&nbsp;</span></p>

A student at Creston Elementary School hides under his desk during "The Great Oregon Shakeout" on Thursday, October 16, 2014. 

This morning at approximately 10:16 a.m. PT, millions of people all over the world practiced dropping, covering and holding on in the event of an earthquake.

Some of you may have been at work, in a car or around town, unknowingly going about your day. If you missed the drill, here's what you need to know.

Emergency management experts and other official preparedness organizations recommend "Drop, Cover and Hold On" as the most appropriate action when you feel the ground shaking:

The website writes that recent studies have found the greatest danger is flying objects, not a building collapsing. In fact, if you're in bed when you feel an earthquake, the safest thing for you to do is stay put and cover your head with a pillow.

If you're driving, pull the car over and cover your head and neck while staying inside the vehicle until the shaking stops.

It's not recommended to stand in a door jam, run outside or drop and cover next to a surface for the "triangle of life." That's a common idea that you're supposed to crouch near an object because it would create a safe pocket in the event that the ceiling collapses. But that's just a myth.

Mark your calendar (and maybe set an alarm) because the next Great Shake Out is already scheduled for Oct. 15, 2015 at 10:15 a.m.

Copyright 2014 Oregon Public Broadcasting