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As It Was: Medford, Ore. Home Converted into Hawthorne Apartments

Michigan timberman L. G. Porter was one of the first settlers in Medford, Ore., after purchasing timberland around Prospect in the 1890s. 

Porter believed that East Medford was a desirable place to live and purchased over five acres there for his home site.  He hired contractor D. W. Hazel to build a large two-story home, considered at the time as one of the most charming and attractive houses in Medford.

The home had a broad veranda across the front and side of the house.  Hazel added a low wall of concrete blocks topped by an ornate cap around the street side of a huge lawn.  The front door opened to a roomy vestibule and formal 240-square-foot parlor.  There was a separate sitting room and a library.

The Medford Mail described the kitchen as “commodious,” with a 305-square-foot formal dining room.  There were five bedrooms with roomy closets and a bath on the second floor.  There was also an upper balcony accessible from the hall.  The family lived there until Porter’s death in 1921.

Their home became the present-day Hawthorne apartments.
 

Source: "Porter Residence an Ideal Home." Mail, 26 Oct. 1906 [Medford, Ore.]; “Early Settler of Medford Passes to His Reward.” Mail Tribune.  July 19, 1921 [Medford, Ore.].

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Maryann Mason has taught history and English in the U.S. Midwest and Northwest, and Bolivia. She has written history spots for local public radio, interviewed mystery writers for RVTV Noir, and edited personal and family histories.  Her poetry has appeared in Sweet Annie & Sweet Pea Review (1999), Rain Magazine (2007), and The Third Reader, an online Journal of Literary Fiction and Poetry. In 2008 she published her first chapbook, Ravelings.  She organized a History Day for Southern Oregon.