Redwood Trees

groveoftitans.com

After the Grove of Titans of redwood trees was identified near Jedediah Smith State Park in 1998, car traffic on nearby roads increased dramatically, as did impromptu trails through the grove, many of which have received widespread publicity via social media.

The increased traffic has brought predictable negative impacts to the area. Now a partnership between environmental groups, California State Parks and the National Park Service has formed to protect the grove from being loved to death by humans. 

Two+two=4/Wikimedia Commons

Some of our trees are looking mighty ragged after several years of drought.  That's to be expected. 

But the kinds of stresses they're showing are new to researchers who know trees well. 

Those include the (southern) coast redwoods and the giant sequoias... many are clearly stressed, and some are dying. 

Redwood expert Anthony Ambrose at the University of California-Berkeley points out that the biggest redwoods need up to 2000 liters of water A DAY to survive, and drought and climate change will challenge that intake. 

A film produced in the 1940's, titled “Redwood Saga,” tells the story of how loggers chopped down California coastal redwood trees in the 1940's.  The producer, Guy Haselton, filmed the 10-minute, black-and-white movie in 1946.  It demonstrates how the redwoods, “now the object of awe and protection, were then regarded simply as commercial assets.”  Home builders around the world sought the redwood lumber because of its beauty and resistance to termites and disease.