national parks

Thomas Wolf, www.foto-tw.de, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=60192449

Our national parks are supposed to be places left in something like their original state.  But the fact that so many people visit them, and in warm seasons of the year, means air pollution is on the rise. 

A recent study found that ozone levels in national parks are on par with ozone levels in big U.S. cities. 

Which raises some issues about whether visits to the parks should be capped, or if vehicle traffic, the main source of ozone, should be sharply curtailed. 

Mark Schuster/U.S. Department of the Interior

Maybe looking at trees and mountains does not generate a lot of money, but people who do those activities spend plenty. 

The National Park Service is totaling up what people spend when they visit national parks across the country. 

And the parks near us (Crater Lake, Lassen, Oregon Caves, Lava Beds, and Redwood) generate something like $143 Million dollars in economic activity. 

Plane777/Wikimedia

  Light the candles on a birthday cake for the National Park Service if you dare, but there will be more candle than cake. 

NPS turns 100 this year, with a number of celebrations. 

Oregon is not overly endowed with NPS facilities, but Crater Lake and Oregon Caves are part of the system, wowing visitors and helping keep their dollars in the region. 

Life And Death In The Lava Beds

Sep 25, 2015
Kenneth Ingham/National Park Service

Open warfare broke out between the U.S. government and Native Americans many times in our region in the late 19th century. 

The incidents include the Modoc War of the 1870s, which took place in and around what is now the Lava Beds National Monument. 

The Modoc War and its setting have been explored many times in print, including the book Modoc: The Tribe That Wouldn't Die by Cheewa James, and a new book on the Lava Beds themselves by Herald and News (Klamath Falls) reporter Lee Juillerat. 

Federal Shutdown Frustrates Crater Lake Visitors

Oct 2, 2013
Gifford Photographic Collection

Crater Lake National Park is closed due to the federal government shutdown—opening up problems for visitors from across the country and across the globe.

From the Herald and News in Klamath Falls, Devan Schwartz reports.

Gifford Photographic Collection

Who would NOT want to work at Crater Lake, high in the mountains, next to the deepest (and bluest) lake in the country? 

John Sollinger gets to the join the small club of people who work at Oregon's only national park. 

Early Snowfall At Crater Lake Park

Sep 26, 2013
National Park Service

Autumn has barely arrived in Oregon, and already snow has fallen at Crater Lake.

Park official Marsha McCabe says there was an unusually early snowfall Tuesday and Wednesday, with eight inches on the ground.

McCabe says September snowfall at the National Park is rare-usually a dusting of an inch or two.

But when things get going in the winter, the snowfall at Crater Lake averages more than 500 inches a year.

McCabe says the North Entrance to the part and West Rim Drive are temporarily closed, but should be reopened by the weekend as the forecast calls for nice weather.