Compass Radio

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Roughly a quarter of the population around the world will experience some form of mental illness at some point.  Yet society still struggles to comprehend diseases that affect the mind and not the body. 

Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford provides a safe space for people with persistent mental illness.  Our monthly visits in Compass Radio provide us with a first-person story of coping with mental illness and its associated challenges. 

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Maybe a quarter of the people in the world will experience mental illness at some point in their lives. So it's not rare, but seeking treatment can be.

Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford welcomes people dealing with persistent mental illness. And once a month in our shared Compass Radio segment, we get to meet house members, to hear their personal stories.

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The stigma may be slowly coming unstuck from mental illness in America, but there's still room for growth.  Just ask the people of Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford. 

Compass House is a "clubhouse" where people with persistent mental illness gather to visit, support each other, and rebuild their lives through a variety of programs and occupations.  Members and staff join us once a month for a segment called Compass Radio, an exploration of what it's truly like to live with mental illness. 

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The end of most institutionalization in mental healthcare means many people with mental illness live among us. 

But it does not necessarily mean mental illness is any better understood.  Stigma still comes with mental illness, a condition Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford works to change. 

Compass House is a clubhouse for people with recurrent mental illness, and our partner in a monthly segment we call simply Compass Radio. 

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We're getting better at understanding and showing compassion for mental illness.  For one thing, we no longer "warehouse" people with mental illness in huge state hospitals, miles from the patients' communities and support systems. 

But people working through mental illness can still be social pariahs.  Clubhouse arrangements like Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford help.  Club members hang and work in a supportive environment. 

Once a month, we meet a member of the club in our Compass Radio segment, and this month, we hear from Jenna. 

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Society is not so great at sympathy for unseen maladies.  People complaining of back pain will often find at least one person who thinks they're faking. 

And so people with diseases of the mind--mental illness--don't often get fully understood or diagnosed.

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The commercial image of the Christmas season is nearly impossible to live up to.  All that smiling and singing and buying and wrapping and surprising can wear people out. 

And people often need to step back to restore mental health.  Mental health is the regular focus of "Compass Radio," our regular monthly segment with Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford. 

And this holiday season, we acknowledge the deep depression some people feel amidst all the bright lights.  The focus this month is suicide and its prevention. 

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We may be getting better over time, but society still fears mental illness in ways it does not shrink from physical illness or injury. 

Many organizations are set up to make life easier for people who struggle with mental illness, including Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford.  Once a month we hear a personal story from a clubhouse member about their own experience. 

This month Compass Radio features a woman with a physical injury among the issues she faces. 

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Fall down and hurt yourself, and there's a good chance someone will come to your aid.  Develop a mental illness, and the circumstances are different. 

Society still misunderstands and even fears mental illness.  Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford works to ease club members into society, and shares stories with us every month in a segment called Compass Radio. 

This month we meet Mihn and Dan and hear about their struggles with both mental illness and blindness. 

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The stigma may be lifting from mental illness, but it's a slow lift.  People get help and compassion with a physical infirmity, but often suspicion and fear with a mental health problem. 

Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford brings people who have dealt with mental health issues together in a common clubhouse, for support and resources. 

Once a month we visit with a club member about living with mental illness, and keeping up the recovery. 

Inside Mental Illness With Compass Radio

Aug 23, 2018
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Conversations about people coping with mental illness can still get into hushed tones. 

Society is pushing the stigma away, but we still don't think of schizophrenia the way we think of lupus, for example.  Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford provides a place for people with mental illness to spend time with other people in similar situations... and get support for living life normally. 

Once a month, our Compass Radio segment brings in the story of another individual from the clubhouse, to give us a better understanding of the trials and treatments of mental illness. 

socompasshouse.org

Mental illness often shows up early in adulthood, but it can affect a person earlier in life. 

This month on Compass Radio we hear from Debra, a Southern Oregon Compass House member who has experienced episodes of mental illness since childhood.

She told Compass House interviewer Bryce Harding that her illness first manifested itself in the form of premonitions – she would actually predict events before they happened. 

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Mike (we'll only use his last name) spent a long time dealing with bipolar disorder before doctors truly understood his condition. 

If you break a leg or come down with a disease that confines you to bed, people generally know what to do.  But that's physical illness.  Mental illness presents a different set of challenges in diagnosis and treatment. 

All of the members of Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford learned this firsthand.  Once a month, we visit with clubhouse members and staffers to explore issues in mental illness, issues we're often hearing about for the first time. 

socompasshouse.org

If you break a leg or come down with a disease that confines you to bed, people generally know what to do.  But that's physical illness. 

Mental illness presents a different set of challenges in diagnosis and treatment. 

All of the members of Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford learned this firsthand. 

Once a month, we visit with clubhouse members and staffers to explore issues in mental illness, issues we're often hearing about for the first time. 

socompasshouse.org

If you break a leg or come down with a disease that confines you to bed, people generally know what to do.  But that's physical illness. 

Mental illness presents a different set of challenges in diagnosis and treatment.  All of the members of Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford learned this firsthand. 

Once a month, we visit with clubhouse members and staffers to explore issues in mental illness, issues we're often hearing about for the first time. 

socompasshouse.org

Mental illness is a problem, period.  But the problems are compounded by not knowing what KIND of mental illness a person is dealing with. 

The wrong diagnosis can send a person down a long trail of difficulties, incorrect treatments, and wrong medications. 

We hear a firsthand account of NOT getting a correct diagnosis from a member of Compass House in Medford, in this month's edition of Compass Radio. 

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It can be tough enough to figure out what's wrong with us when something goes wrong physically.  Some ailments just stump doctors. 

It can be far worse with mental health, and people truly suffer when their mental illnesses go undiagnosed or mis-diagnosed. 

In this month's edition of Compass Radio, we hear the story of a man who spent many years not knowing what was wrong with his mind.  The eventual correct diagnosis changed his life. 

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Mental illness is not good for anyone.  It can endanger the life of the ill person, often by their own decision.  Suicide is a constant challenge for mental health professionals and the people they serve. 

At Compass House in Medford, several club members have stories to tell about considering or attempting suicide. 

We meet one of them, Mary C., in this month's edition of Compass Radio. 

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Life can be hard on anyone, but just imagine trying to navigate daily life while dealing with mental illness. 

People consider and commit suicide when they just can't see a way to a better life. 

Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford takes up the issue of suicide in the latest chapter of Compass Radio. 

We hear the voices of a clubhouse member, a mental health expert, and Executive Director Elizabeth Hazlewood. 

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Our society came to the conclusion that keeping people locked up in mental hospitals was unfair.  But the system that followed can hardly be called a system. 

People with mental illness don't often go to the hospital, but they can end up on the streets or in jail. 

Compass House in Medford offers an alternative... a "clubhouse" model in which people help themselves and each other back from mental illness. 

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