climate action

filmbetrachterin/Pixabay

Something like 1.5 million people took part in "climate strike" actions earlier this year, walking out of school and work to demonstrate support for action to curb climate change. 

Global Climate Strike activities for this Friday, September 20th, are expected to be even bigger.  They are timed to coincide with the opening of the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York on the following Monday. 

Local student discuss planned actions.

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We've got some issues facing us now that require some long-term planning.  Global warming will not be solved immediately; we won't see results of climate-positive actions right away. 

Which makes it hard for creatures bent toward instant gratification.  So how do we modify our behaviors in ways that provide benefits a while from now, perhaps not in our lifetimes? 

Bina Venkataraman examines who we are and what we're capable of in the book The Optimist's Telescope

Candiix/Pixabay

Think globally, act locally. 

But yeesh, what can one family do to slow climate change?  A little bit at a time, and it counts. 

Sue Reed and Ginny Stibolt say instead of wringing our hands, let's roll up our sleeves, and get busy in the garden. 

They provide tips for planting in harmony with nature's current ways, in the book Climate-Wise Landscaping: Practical Actions for a Sustainable Future

peoplesclimate.org

President Trump and people concerned about climate change will observe the president's 100th day in office.  But not in the same way. 

Just as day one of the Trump era featured demonstrators in the streets of Washington and other cities, day 100 will also feature marches and gatherings. 

The People's Climate March is set for Saturday April 29th, organized by Green for All and other groups. 

Ashland's Climate Plan Nears Completion

Dec 15, 2016
Wikimedia Commons

Climate change concerns the planet at large, but requires action at many levels. 

The City of Ashland is one of many local communities that opted to develop a Climate and Energy Action Plan

It is in draft form, has received a large amount of public input, and is moving toward a final document. 

NASA/Public Domain

Last week, the leaders of California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia gathered in San Francisco. 

They pledged to take bold, coordinated action to combat climate change. But as Jefferson Public Radio’s Liam Moriarty explains , the unveiling of the Pacific Coast Action Plan on Climate and Energy has an undercurrent of déjà vu.