April Ehrlich

Reporter | Newscaster | Producer

April Ehrlich is a reporter, newscaster and producer at Jefferson Public Radio. She helps host JPR's local newscasts during Morning Edition, produces radio spots and features as a general reporter, and organizes segments for JPR's daily talk show, the Jefferson Exchange.

Reach her at 541-552-7075 or ehrlicha@sou.edu.

Southern Oregon University

Oregon's public university union workers reached an agreement with Oregon’s public universities over the weekend, averting a strike that was planned for Monday, the first day of the fall term for many college students.


Wikipedia Commons

The California Supreme Court on Wednesday temporarily halted efforts to raise the Shasta Dam by nearly 20 feet.

Geoffrey Riley/JPR News

Many people around the region have had to confront the possibility of losing their homes to wildfire.  The progression may seem simple, load-evacuate-survive, but it's not simple for everyone. 

Challenges from lack of a car to physical disabilities could hinder evacuation.  JPR's April Ehrlich gauged the effects of wildfire on diverse populations in Northern California in a series called "Oppressed By Wildfire."

The series will run the rest of this week (September 24-27) on The Exchange. 

April Ehrlich | JPR News

Wildfire isn’t always a bad thing. In fact, fire has been an integral part of Native American culture for centuries as a tool to keep forests healthy.


April Ehrlich | JPR News

When a major wildfire burns into an urban area, federal disaster officials are quick to offer financial help to people who lose their homes. But not everyone is eligible for aid after a wildfire.

In fact, if you don’t have a home address, there’s a good chance you can’t even get into a shelter.


April Ehrlich | JPR News

Some people say they only had minutes to prepare before they had to flee their homes during the Carr Fire in Shasta County last year. Such short notice was extra challenging for seniors and people with disabilities.


April Ehrlich | JPR News

Abandoning your home while fleeing a wildfire can be a traumatic experience. It’s even scarier if you don’t understand the language of the evacuation alerts chiming into your phone.


Kim Budd / Oregon Shakespeare Festival

With flowers and children in tow, people crowded into an Ashland theater last week to watch their friends and family become naturalized U.S. citizens.

April Ehrlich | JPR News

The Ashland City Council passed a controversial ordinance Tuesday night that opponents fear will criminalize homeless people and allow police racial profiling.

Those protestors lined outside the Ashland council chambers to voice their concerns on what they call the “stop and identify” ordinance, which allows police to arrest someone who they suspect of breaking city rules if they don’t provide their name and date of birth.

christopdesoto via Flickr

A suspect died after an officer-involved shooting Tuesday morning at the Oregon State Police office in Grants Pass.

Ashland Police

Ashland City Councilors will discuss a proposed ordinance Tuesday night that would allow police officers to demand someone’s name and birth date, even if they haven’t committed a crime.

Ordinance 3176 would create a new offense — “Failure to Provide Name and Date of Birth to a Peace Officer.”  Police can ask for that information if they suspect that person of committing a city violation. Under the ordinance, if someone refuses to provide their name and birth date to an officer who requests it, they could be charged with a misdemeanor. That charge could result in hundreds of dollars in fines and weeks in jail.

Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival is bringing its popular Green Show indoors, at least when it’s too smoky outside to perform.

When a show is moved from the outdoor Allen Elizabethan Theatre to the indoor Mountain Avenue Theater at Ashland High School, then the Green Show will also be moved indoors for streaming-only performances.

Smoky Air Is Back, To Businesses' Dismay

Jul 29, 2019
April Ehrlich | JPR News

The Milepost 97 fire in Douglas County is pushing clouds of unhealthy air into southern Oregon and even into California.

April Ehrlich | JPR News

Hundreds of people gathered at the Sundial Bridge in Redding Friday night to remember what was lost in  last year’s Carr Fire in Shasta County, which took several lives and destroyed more than a thousand homes.

April Ehrlich / JPR

America's biggest broadcast media company is financially backing the owner of the Rogue Valley’s largest newspaper in a way that’s raising questions about the influence of outside money on local news.

The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of California has charged a couple for allegedly taking advantage of a Guatemalan family by coercing them into the United States and forcing them to stay after their visas expired.

The indictment says that Nery and Maura Martinez promised the mother and her two children a more comfortable life with livable wages while they worked at a Mexican restaurant and carpet cleaning service in Shasta Lake. The couple owned Latino's Mexican Restaurant and Redding Carpet Cleaning & Janitorial Services.

Ashland Police

Ashland city councilors are considering an ordinance Tuesday night that requires someone who has been stopped by police to provide their name and date of birth.

Ashland police say people are increasingly refusing to provide their names when they are stopped for potentially violating a law.

An Oregon Supreme Court ruling in 2017 concluded that this sort of  “passive behavior” wasn’t in itself a violation. But without a name and date of birth, police can’t issue a ticket.

Wikipedia Commons

Klamath County has long struggled with the highest unemployment rates in the state. And now, it’s likely to lose about 300 jobs this summer.

RV Saltshakers Facebook Page

As conservative states continue to challenge federal laws on abortion, in deep blue Oregon, the debate over abortion rights is happening on a much smaller scale, and it’s happening on your average street corner.

About 400 people turned out to a community meeting with fire managers in Merlin, Oregon, as the Taylor Creek Fire threatened hundreds of homes.
Emily Cureton / OPB

Josephine County officials are again asking rural voters if they would like a publicly funded fire district. But this time, it’s in the form of an advisory question on the May 21 ballot.


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