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'We Are Part Of The United States': The 1st People Counted For The 2020 Census

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Lizzie Chimiugak Nenguryarr, an elder of Toksook Bay who recently celebrated what she considered to be at least her 90th birthday, was the first person counted for the 2020 census.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Lizzie Chimiugak Nenguryarr, an elder of Toksook Bay who recently celebrated what she considered to be at least her 90th birthday, was the first person counted for the 2020 census.
Lizzie Chimiugak Nenguryarr's house in Toksook Bay. The village, home to members of the Nunakauyarmiut Tribe, was established in 1964.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Lizzie Chimiugak Nenguryarr's house in Toksook Bay. The village, home to members of the Nunakauyarmiut Tribe, was established in 1964.
Katie Schwartz Nuiyaaq, one of Nenguryarr's daughters, helped interpret during her mother's census interview. Schwartz, who speaks Yup'ik and English, was the second person to be counted for the 2020 census. "Not very many people can say, 'I'm No. 2,' " she said.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Katie Schwartz Nuiyaaq, one of Nenguryarr's daughters, helped interpret during her mother's census interview. Schwartz, who speaks Yup'ik and English, was the second person to be counted for the 2020 census. "Not very many people can say, 'I'm No. 2,' " she said.
Older residents still remember when they moved their homes, pulled by dog sled, from neighboring Nightmute, Alaska, to make what was once a fishing camp into a permanent settlement. Now dogs abound, but the moving of goods is mainly done with snow machines and all-terrain vehicles<em>.</em>
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Older residents still remember when they moved their homes, pulled by dog sled, from neighboring Nightmute, Alaska, to make what was once a fishing camp into a permanent settlement. Now dogs abound, but the moving of goods is mainly done with snow machines and all-terrain vehicles.
Noah Lincoln holds a gun his family uses for hunting. People in Toksook Bay rely on hunting and other subsistence activities.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Noah Lincoln holds a gun his family uses for hunting. People in Toksook Bay rely on hunting and other subsistence activities.
Members of Nelson Island School's basketball team prepare to travel by snow machine-pulled wooden sleds to an away game at a neighboring village.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Members of Nelson Island School's basketball team prepare to travel by snow machine-pulled wooden sleds to an away game at a neighboring village.
The U.S. Post Office in Toksook Bay.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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The U.S. Post Office in Toksook Bay.
A tapestry depicting Jesus Christ hangs on the wall of a home where friends and family gather to mourn the death of a loved one in Toksook Bay in January.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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A tapestry depicting Jesus Christ hangs on the wall of a home where friends and family gather to mourn the death of a loved one in Toksook Bay in January.
Top: Mick Chakuchin stands on the ice at the edge of Toksook Bay to fish for smelt. Left: Part of a bait fish at the edge of an ice fishing hole. Right: Chakuchin and his uncle, Jackie Woods, work on opening and keeping open holes in the ice from which they hope to catch smelts.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Top: Mick Chakuchin stands on the ice at the edge of Toksook Bay to fish for smelt. Left: Part of a bait fish at the edge of an ice fishing hole. Right: Chakuchin and his uncle, Jackie Woods, work on opening and keeping open holes in the ice from which they hope to catch smelts.
Maria White and her son Lance Jimmie, 3, stand near their home in Toksook Bay. White works at Bayview General Merchandise, one of the three convenience stores in Toksook Bay.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Maria White and her son Lance Jimmie, 3, stand near their home in Toksook Bay. White works at Bayview General Merchandise, one of the three convenience stores in Toksook Bay.
Larry John owns John's Store, the oldest of Toksook Bay's three convenience stores.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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Larry John owns John's Store, the oldest of Toksook Bay's three convenience stores.
A home with the front light on in Toksook Bay.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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A home with the front light on in Toksook Bay.
A children's bicycle lays in snow from a recent winter storm.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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A children's bicycle lays in snow from a recent winter storm.
People wait for a plane to arrive at the airstrip in Toksook Bay.
Claire Harbage / NPR
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People wait for a plane to arrive at the airstrip in Toksook Bay.

Claire Harbage
Hansi Lo Wang
Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a national correspondent for NPR reporting on the people, power and money behind the U.S. census.