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Police Remind The Public Pets Can Die In Hot Vehicles

Animal Legal Defence Fund
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With temperatures in the mid-90s this weekend, Eugene police are urging people not to leave their pets in vehicles. As of Thursday afternoon, they were out on their 5th call about a dog that was left in a hot car. 

Oregon-Hot-Cars-Article.jpg
Credit Animal Legal Defence Fund
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Molly Monette is Animal Welfare Supervisor for the Eugene Police Department. She says within 10 minutes of exposure in a hot car, pets can experience heat-stroke or death.

A Eugene Police officer uses a thermometer to take the temperature inside a parked vehicle. It reads 106.
Credit Eugene Police
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A Eugene Police officer uses a thermometer to take the temperature inside a parked vehicle. It reads 106.

“If you aren’t in the vehicle then your pet shouldn’t be in there either.’ Monette says, “So, if people are leaving their pets at home, we would be telling them to make sure they have plenty of water, that there’s cool places inside the house. But, leaving pets in cars, like if you’re going to work, it’s just not acceptable.”

A new state law (H.B. 2732) says citizens can attempt to rescue unattended children or pets from vehicles under certain circumstances but Monette asks that they contact authorities first. People can be cited for animal neglect for leaving pets in cars.

 

Copyright 2018 KLCC

Rachael McDonald is News Director at KLCC. She’s been with the station for more than 10 years. Previously, she established the Richland, Washington bureau for the Northwest News Network. She also worked as News Director at KAZU in Monterey, California. Rachael has won numerous awards for her reporting.