The Jefferson Exchange

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JPR's live interactive program devoted to current events and newsmakers from around the region and beyond. It airs on JPR's News & Information service. Choose that service from the stream above or find your station here.

Participate in the live program by calling 800-838-3760 or emailing JX@jeffnet.org

redelvises.com

Josh Gross has a passion for music. 

Safe to say that Josh loves music in many forms, and he gets to demonstrate it by making his own AND by covering the music of others in his writing. 

We plug Josh into the Exchange once a month in a segment we call Rogue Sounds. 

ODF

At times during this and any fire season, it can seem like every single person who works for the Oregon Department of Forestry is out fighting fires.  But somebody has to stay in the offices. 

Count Pete Parsons among them.  He is an ODF meteorologist, keeping track of the weather now and in the future. 

One of his duties is to prepare a seasonal climate forecast, and he just delivered one a matter of days ago.  So we have many questions, including just what we can expect for the rest of the summer and the early fall. 

Oregon Judicial Department

By now women have performed most of the jobs on the planet, so there are few surprises. 

But it was a first when Martha L. Walters took office as Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court

She is the first woman to occupy the position. 

Wikimedia

Even people who understand the stock market and a few things about finance can get overwhelmed by the wealth of information about money. 

Chad Gordon aims to keep people merely whelmed, with a grasp of what they need to know to keep some sense of order to their finances. 

Chad is an investment advisor who channelled what he knows and what he learned into a very accessible book, Wealth by Virtue

Maybe you're pining for fall already, and a break from heat and smoke. 

But we've got long, warm days and maybe even a little time off from work.  That's the reason summer is so conducive to a little extra reading.  Or a lot, if we're lucky. 

Our Summer Reads segment is back for a second summer, visiting with local and locally-owned bookstores to get ideas for good summertime reads. 

Northtown Books in Arcata is the latest independent book store to check in with some items for your reading consideration. 

You can't have a forest fire without an argument about what contributed to the severity of the fire.  Now researchers from the forestry departments at Humboldt State and Oregon State Universities weigh in with research on differences between public and private land. 

In general, the work found that the fire severity is greater on private lands with younger trees, most of the same type. 

Conversely, the fire severity was less on adjacent public lands with greater variety of tree species and age. 

ivanovgood/Pixabay

Creativity is admired and sought-after, if not always appreciated. 

But what does it take to be creative, what makes one person creative and another person less so?  These topics and more will be explored at the first-ever Creativity Conference held at Southern Oregon University, August 3rd through 6th. 

Daniel Deneui, a psychology professor at SOU, is the organizer. 

TeroVesalainen/Pixabay

Not all relationships are created equal.  But most contain some element of power dynamics... one person wielding--or trying to--some power over another person. 

Too bad there's not an owner's manual for relationships. 

There is, though, The Power Manual by Cyndi Suarez, which covers the keys to power and how to use them. 

Rosecityarchery.com

Technology can be a great help to a person who wants to go hunting. 

Even in the ancient skill of archery, all kinds of high-tech materials can be used to make bows and arrows.  No thanks, says Rose City Archery

RCA, based in Myrtle Point, makes arrows the old-fashioned way, out of Port Orford Cedar, abundant on the Oregon Coast. 

Bureau of Land Management / Flickr

If President Donald Trump has his way, the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument straddling the state line will get smaller. 

Wikimedia

Jon Meacham has written some fine biographies of Americans, including one on Andrew Jackson that won a Pulitzer Prize.  Now it's not a person Meacham is examining, but a whole country. 

That's the gist of his latest work, The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels.  In the book, Meacham points out several times in American history when we were at each other's throats, figuratively if not actually, and managed to come through. 

The key: finding and accentuating those better angels. 

ODF

Not only is fire season generally longer in our part of the world, but the fires themselves act differently. 

Managers on a number of recent fires reported fire behavior they had never seen before. 

MakyFoto/Pixabay

After every school shooting, the standard question is: what might have prevented this?  Metal detectors and armed teachers aside, there are efforts to figure out which students are thinking about committing violence on their classmates. 

But the process of identifying potential shooters brings some risks, too.  Like what if the assessment is wrong?  And how can a student be reintegrated into the school community after being singled out? 

These are issues considered by John Van Dreal, who runs the safety and risk management programs at Salem-Keizer schools, and by Jeffrey Sprague, who is the co-director of the Institute on Violence and Destructive Behavior at the University of Oregon College of Education. 

AlexVan/Pixabay

Adam Benforado is a lawyer, but not a big fan of the criminal justice system, at least the way it works now. 

The big problem, as he sees it, is a human one: people have flaws, so flawed people run the criminal justice system.  And they often make things worse by trying to cover their flaws, in Benforado's view. 

He joined us in 2015 to talk about his book Unfair: The New Science of Criminal Injustice

davispigeon0/Pixabay

When even Eugene hits a daytime high of 100°F, it's just plain hot out there.  It's possible you have to work out there when it's hot. 

By the accounting of several activist groups, millions of American workers lack protections from heat stress. 

Those organizations, including Public Citizen, are petitioning the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to require some protections to be provided by employers. 

Michelle Alaimo/courtesy of Smoke Signals

The people who killed Native Americans and marched the survivors off to reservations had few qualms about taking their cultural artifacts as well.  Pieces of tribal history sit in museum displays all over the world. 

Now the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde in Oregon have their own place to display items from the ancestors, the Chachalu Museum.  It is the focus of this month's Underground History, our monthly partnership with the Southern Oregon University Laboratory of Anthropology (SOULA)

Briece Edwards, who runs the Historic Preservation Office for the tribes, is our guest. 

Lulu Vision

You see an orchestra assemble, and you expect to hear a piece like Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, or a prelude, partita, or concerto. 

But Friday night, July 27, the Britt Orchestra will perform a new piece called simply emergency shelter intake form.  The lack of capitals is intentional. 

The piece, by Gabriel Kahane, is meant to focus attention on housing insecurity in the region. 

TeroVesalainen/Pixabay

There are certain levels of intimacy we do and do not allow in our relations with other people, especially in business settings.  Thompson Barton uses a simple term: fear. 

He says fear motivates many of our interactions with other people.  That leads to the unspoke request that is also the title of his book: Please Lie to Me

Barton is a business consultant based in Ashland, practicing Accountable Communication Technology (ACT).  In his book, he offers an alternative to the fear he sees. 

Okay, it's smoky at the moment.  But we've got long, warm days and maybe even a little time off from work. 

That's the reason summer is so conducive to a little extra reading.  Or a lot, if we're lucky. 

Our Summer Reads segment is back for a second summer, visiting with local and locally-owned bookstores to get ideas for good summertime reads. 

J. Michaels Books in Eugene is the latest independent book store to check in with some items for your reading consideration. 

Bru-nO/Pixabay

Humans have been drinking wine for a very long time.  And we've generally figured out which grapes grow best in certain climates. 

Trouble is, the climates are more variable than they used to be.  That's created a problem for winemakers, and a career for Greg Jones

Dr. Jones is regarded as one of the top wine climatologists in the world, and he left Southern Oregon University for Linfield College last year. 

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