John Baxter

Jefferson Exchange Producer

John Baxter's history at JPR reaches back three decades.  John was the JPR program director who was the architect of the split from a single station into three separate program services.  We're thrilled that John has taken a hiatus from his retirement to join JPR as co-producer of the Jefferson Exchange.

leestilltaolcom/Pixabay

Slavery has long been illegal in the United States, but people are still forced to work and have sex against their will. 

Law enforcement continues to work to crack down on human trafficking, but it's a long haul.  Truckers are keeping their eyes out for people being trafficked; that's the focus of Truckers Against Trafficking

The program comes complete with a training program to make truckers more effective at spotting trafficking. 

Skeeze/Pixabay

Fire season clearly still has a while to go, but it's never too early to talk about what happened this year, and why. 

A Smoke and Fire Summit is set for next weekend (Saturday, September 15th) at Southern Oregon University, to help people better understand the contributing factors to a destructive and smoky summer. We hear from Marko Bey of the Lomakatsi Restoration Project, and Don Ferguson, retired from a long career at the federal Bureau of Land Management working on wildland fires.

Meanwhile, the Nature Conservancy recently published a study looking at the history of wildfire behavior in the Rogue River Basin, and will follow it up with a public field trip to look at parts of the forest affected by fire. We hear from its lead author and forest ecologist Kerry Metlen.

Runner1616, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=39215568

You can find film festivals all over the country now, but few that focus on just films from and about Oregon. 

But that is the mission at the Klamath Independent Film Festival, lighting up screens in Klamath Falls the weekend of September 14-16. 

From features about imperiled horses ("Lean on Pete") to documentaries about the arts scene in the Klamath Basin itself ("Ragland"), there's a bunch to see. 

U.S. Navy photo, Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Jason T. Poplin.

Notice all the colored folders next time you're at the doctor's office; many medical records are still stored on paper. 

But the industry has been pushing for years now toward more computerization, more use of electronic health records (EHR).  It's taking time to convert, but one trend is clear: more IT workers in the health industry. 

William Hersh, MD and teacher of medical informatics at Oregon Health & Science University, tracks the trends in health record adoption. 

Voice of America

The number of women who report being sexually assaulted in America are surprising enough.  But the numbers are shockingly high for Native American women. 

And the shock goes beyond sexual assault to murder and kidnap... these too happen at higher rates for native women than for the rest of the population. 

Southern Oregon Digital Archive

The back-to-the-land movement of the 1970s did a lot to populate the hills and hollers of our region. 

Thalia Truesdell was one of the people who came looking for a simpler way of life... she settled in Sawyer's Bar on the California side, buying some land there. 

Her experiences there and later in the Applegate Valley are the subject of this month's edition of Stories of Southern Oregon, curated by Maureen Flanagan Battistella for the Southern Oregon Digital Archive

The great explorers all had a whole lot of unknown in front of them.  They had no idea what they'd find, and they came back with big surprises (think Charles Darwin, for one example). 

The mystery is mostly gone on an Earth now completely mapped.  Or is it? 

C.J. Samson/Wikimedia

Protecting animals on the Earth can be a tricky proposition.  Case in point: creating marine reserves to protect fish and other ocean creatures. 

In the South Pacific, the announcement that reserves would be created in the future actually led to increased fishing before the reserves were established.  This is just one impact on fisheries tracked by economist Grant McDermott at the University of Oregon. 

He is this month's guest in Curious: Research Meets Radio. 

Public Domain, Pixabay

One of the better features of modern cars is that they can tell you what's wrong with them.  Not in words, but with computer codes. 

The advent of computer diagnostics makes it a whole lot easier to figure out what ails a car.  But somebody's still got to fix it, and that's Zach Edwards' business at Ashland Automotive

Once a month he visits to answer our questions and yours about mysteries under the hood.  We call the segment The Squeaky Wheel, and invite you to call or write and be that wheel. 

guvo59/Pixabay

Mark Leibovich's normal beat for the New York Times Magazine is Washington, DC and presidential politics. But for the last four years he's also been shadowing the NFL, publishing profiles of the game's more controversial figures, like Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and the Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones.

Leibovich says we've hit "peak football," and he sees the NFL's decline in the past few years as a metaphor for the country's political and cultural anxiety. His book is Big Game: The NFL in Dangerous Times

Instagram

Ah, the balance of September.  A little summer, a little fall, the days roughly equal in length to the nights, the temperatures (usually) not too extreme. 

Sounds like a great month for arts activities, and there will be plenty to enjoy. 

Our First Friday Arts segment showcases them, with the help of many phone calls.  We invite arts groups from around the region to call 800-838-3760 live in the morning to plug arts events for the coming weeks. 

Public Domain, Wikimedia

Tim Holt usually makes stage appearances with a musical instrument, as in his tribute to the songs of Pete Seeger.  But this time around, Tim finds music in the words themselves. 

He celebrates the poetry of Walt Whitman with a work he wrote himself, "Walking With Walt."  The play is about a man inspired by Whitman's poetry to walk the country. 

Tim Holt walks to a phone to tell us about putting the work onstage at College of the Siskiyous in Weed, this weekend and next.

Wikimedia

Number one and still champion: Southern Oregon University tops the list of Bee Campuses across the country.  Which makes sense, because SOU was the first school so identified, adopting the methods of the Bee City USA program. 

The Sierra Club recently put out its list of pollinator-friendly campuses, and there was SOU, atop the list again.  Several departments and many people contributed to the effort. 

Jacob Frank\National Park Service

You don't have to be an astronomer, professional or amateur, to appreciate the night sky.  It's just pretty to look at, especially when there's less interference from artificial light. 

Dark sky aficionados work to convince people that we don't need to put THAT much light on at night; we can still have security without blotting out the night sky. 

Count the people of Southern Oregon Skywatchers and Lights Out Bend among those who prefer dark skies full of stars. 

Meditations/Pixabay

Jesus loves you, Christians often say.  But the nature of the love of his followers for each other is very much up for debate. 

Linda Kay Klein grew up in an evangelical Christian family in which young women were taught to hide their sexuality, especially from their male contemporaries.  Klein believed that her "purity" was so important that she took multiple pregnancy tests--before she ever had sex. 

She relates tales of shame and fear, and eventual awareness, in her book Pure: Inside the Evangelical Movement That Shamed a Generation of Young Women and How I Broke Free

Facebook

Rogue Sounds are not necessarily sounds that come from rogue bands.  It's just that they are coming to play in or near the Rogue Valley that they come to the attention of Josh Gross

He is himself a musician, a lover of music, and a writer of music (and theater, but that's another story). 

Once a month Josh picks a short list of bands coming to town, chooses representative samples of their music, and joins us on the air to talk about them.  Voila: Rogue Sounds. 

oregoncarepartners.com

Teenagers may be the people feeling the most angst, but they are not the people committing the most suicides in the United States. 

Much older Americans are the ones ending their lives, and Oregon ranks in the top ten states for suicide deaths.  Older white males are most prone to suicide in Oregon. 

Sean Connolly is a behavioral health specialist with Senior & Disability Services at the Rogue Valley Council of Governments (RVCOG). 

Wikimedia

Sea levels are rising with global warming, and it should surprise no one to hear that the situation may increase tsunami risk

A study involving researchers from several countries looked at how much tsunami risk might increase as low-lying areas get even lower relative to sea level. 

The study focused on Macau, a Chinese territory, but it could potentially have implications for many low-lying coastal areas. 

Picture of a drought affected landscape
CSIRO

There is much that is wonderful about living in the West.  Lack of humidity, for example. 

But that's an indicator of a basic fact of life: there's not much precipitation in this part of the country, at least south of Eugene, and so not much water for all the people and nature. 

Marc Reisner covered the topic in  great depth in his monumental work Cadillac Desert, first published in 1986.  He covered the history: dams and diversions, rivers and reclamation, and the underlying issue: too much demand for too little water. 

Drought has only made the book truer over time.  Lawrie Mott, Reisner's widow, is a scientist and the writer of additional material for later editions of the book. 

Much has been said about the big deficit in Oregon's public pension program, PERS. 

Now Stacy Bannerman has something new to say about it: PERS should get any of its investments out of companies that make weapons of war.  Bannerman, the head of Women's EcoPeace, brought her group and others into a coalition, calling upon state leaders to "divest PERS from the war machine." 

Pages