Geoffrey Riley

News Director | Jefferson Exchange Host

Geoffrey Riley began practicing journalism in the State of Jefferson more than three decades ago, as a reporter and anchor for a Medford TV station. It was about the same time that he began listening to Jefferson Public Radio, and thought he might one day work there. He was right.

Geoff came to JPR as a backup host on The Jefferson Exchange in late 2000, and he assumed the full-time host job at the beginning of 2010. The two hours of the Exchange allow him to join our listeners in exploring issues both large and small, local and global. In addition to hosting The Exchange, Geoff oversees JPR’s news department as its News Director.

Geoff is a New York native, with stints in broadcast news in Missouri, Alabama, and Wisconsin before his arrival in Oregon. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Jami Dwyer/Wikimedia

The world is aware of the conversion of forest to farm in many places.  And governments and businesses have dedicated themselves to stopping deforestation for commodity production. 

A recent scientific report shows that much more work is needed; the rate of deforestation has not declined. 

Mark Buckawicki/Wikimedia

Oregon already had some of the most liberal abortion laws in the country, before the legislature passed House Bill 3391 last year.  That extended state payments for abortions to include people living in the country illegally. 

And it made putting Measure 106 on the ballot easier for its supporters.  106 would forbid state tax money from being used for most abortions. 

Supporters of the measure--No on abortion is Yes on the measure--visited on October 2nd. 

Forward Together and Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon are among the groups opposing 106. 

Hans/Pixabay

We cast our attention backwards on the musical timeline pretty easily, from hip-hop back to Bach.  But before that?  A little fuzzy, generally. 

And that's why Musica Matrix exists, to share music from the time of Shakespeare and earlier with audiences young and old.  The group plays this Saturday (October 6th) at Ashland Springs Hotel. 

Cait Bourgault/whenparticlescollide.com

Josh Gross expresses his passion for music so well, we only give him 15 minutes on the air.  A month. 

And he makes the most of the time, exposing us to a handful of bands making appearances in the region in the coming weeks. 

It's a segment we call Rogue Sounds, and it's an early kickoff to a weekend that includes our First Friday Arts segment. 

Felice Pace/Wikimedia Commons

The Yurok tribe is looking for funding for "wellness villages," which are planned living sites along the river where the tribe can help reintegrate people who have struggled with addiction.

Yurok Chief Judge Abby Abinanti, among others, proposed the wellness villages as a possible remedy. But it will take a few dollars to move the idea from concept to reality. 

John Sepulvado/OPB

Several counties will vote in November on versions of a “Second Amendment Protection” measure.

The measure expands the definition of firearms and limits enforcement of firearms in laws. If passed, it would mandate that definitions of firearms be interpreted as including firearm accessories and ammunition. 

In general, it would put the county on record as opposing state efforts to curtail gun ownership rights.

Jackson County's version is measure 15-181, the Right to Bear Arms Amendment.  Penny Okamoto of Ceasefire Oregon is against the measure.

NOAA

The rain finally returned before the end of September, but it will take a lot more of it to reverse the region's drought. 

All of Oregon west of the Cascades is in either moderate or severe drought, and our part of California is not much better. 

So what do we do when it's been this dry for this long, and what are the prospects for catching up on precipitation?  We put those questions to Eric Dittmer, geologist, professor, and former water resource planner for the Rogue Valley Council of Governments, and to Ryan Sandler from the National Weather Service in Medford. 

Eleanor Stills via NPR

First the Hollies. Then Crosby, Stills and Nash. Then Crosby, Stills Nash and Young. Then, a long solo career.

Graham Nash hasn't just seen the history of contemporary popular music, he's made much of it.

Nash plays tonight (October 3rd) at the Cascade Theater in Redding, and he's making a major donation to help victims of the Carr fire.

People got angry when a Barbie doll was introduced that spoke the phrase "math class is tough."  Yet 26 years later, there is still plenty of evidence that girls avoid the STEM subjects: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math.

Komal Singh at Google noticed the trend herself, and decided to do something about it. 

Her response is a book for girls called Ara the Star Engineer.  The book mixes the fictional Ara with real-life women who have made great gains in technology. 

Mark Buckawicki/Wikimedia

Oregon's list of statewide ballot measures in the November election includes a measure on abortion. 

Measure 106 would change the state constitution and forbid the spending of public money on abortions. 

A coalition called Oregon Life United is leading the campaign to pass the measure. 

fantareis/Pixabay

The fictional Ebenezer Scrooge said of the world "There is nothing on which it is so hard as poverty."  We comfort ourselves by thinking, nearly 200 years later, that we treat poor people better now. 

Sarah Smarsh begs to differ.  She found in her life that to have less means people often think you are less. 

Smarsh unfolds that view in Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth

Irvin calicut, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=16024219

Thinking about towing that heavy trailer from the back of your Prius? Maybe think twice about it.

Once a month, Zach Edwards of Ashland Automotive visits to answer our questions and yours about mysteries under the hood.

caballitonegro.com

The composer John Luther Adams is famous for creating works about the great outdoors, many inspired by his years living in Alaska. 

Adams won a Pulitzer Prize for "Become Ocean" in 2014.  Another work, "songbirdsongs," (lower-case letters deliberate) plays to an audience in Ashland this weekend (September 29). 

Tessa Brinkman and Terry Longshore of Caballito Negro perform, with a roster of guest artists. 

Public Domain, Wikimedia

Think about the supplies needed in a medical training facility: bandages, stethoscopes, defibrillators, makeup.  Makeup? 

True... before health workers treat people with serious injuries, they need to practice on people who APPEAR to have serious injuries.  And that's where the practice of "moulage" comes in. 

It's basically the use of realistic theater/movie makeup to simulate lacerations and broken bones and more.  And it is valuable for training at Oregon Health & Science University

Zoey/http://www.livetiny365.com/

It's been described as a "movement," but building small structures is nothing new.  Tiny houses were the natural choice before humans began building bigger houses. 

And Derek Diedricksen began working on small-scale buildings years ago.  He gives an overview of such buildings and a variety of uses for them in his book Microshelters: 59 Creative Cabins, Tiny Houses, Tree Houses, and Other Small Structures

Jurek Durczak, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2982346

Johnny Rotten had it easy in England. Try being an East German punk with the Stasi looking over your shoulder.

Tim Mohr, Berlin-based DJ, translator and music scholar, has written a history of the underground punk scene in East Germany just before the fall of the Berlin Wall, called Burning Down the Haus: Punk Rock, Revolution, and the Fall of the Berlin Wall.

via pixabay

Homework help, computer lab, play place and more.  Those are among the functions of the new Spark Space opening at the Jackson County Library branch in Central Point. 

It's a STEM kind of place (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics), but also gives teens and tweens a place to be creative with computers, blogging and coding and more. 

worldpeaceflame.org

Simple concept, difficult execution: bringing peace to all the world.  The World Peace Flame was first lit in 1999, and now burns on all the continents of the Earth. 

Only one burns in the United States, at the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis.  A second one begins to burn in Ashland tonight (September 21), at the Thalden Pavilion on the Southern Oregon University campus. 

RV Symphony

It's a part of autumn just as much as falling leaves: the beginning of the Rogue Valley Symphony's concert season. 

Big pieces and big players are on the menu for the season, beginning next Friday (September 28) in Ashland. 

Music Director Martin Majkut splits his time between the Rogue Valley, another orchestra in New York City, and home in Slovakia. 

By Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1969-065-24 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 de, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5418804

In our current divided political climate the word "fascist" is an all-purpose insult used by the left to describe members of the alt-right. Much like "socialist" or "liberal" is hurled in the opposite direction.

But what exactly constitutes fascism? In his new book, How Fascism Works, Jason Stanley has a simple formula: fascist politics uses divisiveness to attain power.

He also describes the ten pillars of fascist politics. And he points out that a country need not be fascist to experience fascism. 

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