April Ehrlich

Morning Edition Host/Jefferson Exchange Producer

April Ehrlich began freelancing for Jefferson Public Radio in 2016. She officially joined the team as Morning Edition Host and a Jefferson Exchange producer in August 2017.

April previously worked as a reporter covering local government, housing, and the environment in rural Oregon and Idaho. She also served a two-year stint with AmeriCorps, where she worked with nonprofits helping low-income communities in rural Oregon. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in English at Cal-State University, Fullerton, where she worked as an editor for the campus paper.

April spends her free time hiking through nearby forests with a rambunctious border collie or reading fiction at home with her two favorite cats.

Thomas Wolf, www.foto-tw.de, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=60192449

Our national parks are supposed to be places left in something like their original state.  But the fact that so many people visit them, and in warm seasons of the year, means air pollution is on the rise. 

A recent study found that ozone levels in national parks are on par with ozone levels in big U.S. cities. 

Which raises some issues about whether visits to the parks should be capped, or if vehicle traffic, the main source of ozone, should be sharply curtailed. 

Walter Gresham, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6409170

The famous "lost colony" of Roanoke Island, North Carolina, has a lot of myths built up around it.  How could a colony of 115 people just disappear? 

Much of our thinking about this 16th-century event comes from 19th-century accounts.  Science writer Andrew Lawler brings 21st-century analysis to the vanished English colony... and explores the possibility that the colonists just took up with local natives and never looked back. 

That's the thrust of The Secret Token: Myth, Obsession and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke

Austin Jenkins/Northwest News Network

The federal government says marijuana is just plain illegal.  The state says it's legal for medical and recreational use. 

That's one level of complication... now what about at the local government level? 

Jackson County Administrator Danny Jordan says the phone rings a lot at county offices, with people asking questions about what is and is not legal in the growing of cannabis. 

Mészáros Zoltán, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=49966768

When you think about all the processes that go on in our cars and trucks, it's something of a miracle that they work as well as they do.  There's a lot that can go wrong. 

And Zach Edwards makes a living from setting those things right again.  Zach is the owner of Ashland Automotive and a monthly visitor to The Exchange for our car-care segment, The Squeaky Wheel. 

What's squeaking or chattering or rubbing or grinding on your vehicle?

Kungfukomedy.com

Audrey Murray is a writer and comedian with a bit of an obsession with Russia.  Not in a mess-with-elections kind of way, mind you. 

But she did spend some time exploring the former republics of the Soviet Union, and got way more adventure than she bargained for. 

Audrey tells the story in her book Open Mic Night in Moscow

Oregon Cabaret Theatre

It's been a bumpy few weeks for the arts world.  Wildfire smoke has forced cancellations of outdoor plays at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and forced the Britt Orchestra indoors. 

But there's a lot of summer left, and a lot of great arts events planned for stages and galleries across this wide region. 

We get a list of the events in our monthly First Friday Arts segment.  You can listen and make plans, or you can call with details of an arts event near you... just call 800-838-3760 during the live airing of the show, Friday between 8 and 8:30 AM. 

A major big-city newspaper (New York Daily News) lays off half of its editorial staff. 

Its former owner runs into fresh interference at the FCC in an attempt to create a mega-group of television stations. 

And people keep tweeting... lots and lots of tweets.  Just another month in the media in 2018, a month we cover with our friends from the Communication faculty at Southern Oregon University

Precious Yamaguchi and Andrew Gay discuss media in a broad range, from books to digital media. 

Indian Country Today went dormant for a while. 

The online source of news about Native Americans and by Native Americans had to figure out a way to become and stay financially viable, like many a news organization in the 2010s. 

ICT got back in the game earlier this year with the naming of a new editor and associate editor. 

roanokecollege, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=29696951

A guy connected to Lego must know something about creativity. 

And that is indeed the case for Ronald Beghetto.  One of his many hats is serving as a creativity advisor for the Lego Foundation. 

But Dr. Beghetto wears many others in studying and working to inspire creativity, especially in education.  He is one of the speakers at the Creativity Conference at Southern Oregon University August 3-6. 

naleck/Wikimedia

The name "Grateful Dead" got ironic indeed after the death of lead guitarist Jerry Garcia. 

The remaining "core four" of the band could not decide on an appropriate legacy for the band or its most famous, and now missing, member.  And it took 20 years for an agreement to emerge, and the "Fare Thee Well" tour was the result. 

The tour gave a title to Joel Selvin's book, Fare Thee Well: The Final Chapter of the Grateful Dead's Long, Strange Trip

redelvises.com

Josh Gross has a passion for music. 

Safe to say that Josh loves music in many forms, and he gets to demonstrate it by making his own AND by covering the music of others in his writing. 

We plug Josh into the Exchange once a month in a segment we call Rogue Sounds. 

April Ehrlich | JPR

 

When a wildfire hits and people have to evacuate their homes, they often refuse to leave their pets behind. They pack their dogs in carriers and crates and head to the nearest emergency animal shelter, if there is one.

But increasingly people are refusing to separate from their pets, even if that means they can’t sleep in an evacuation center.

That was the case during the massive wildfire in Northern California that erupted last week. 

Amy Faubion said she wanted to sleep in the air-conditioned shelter with her dogs, but she couldn't

ODF

At times during this and any fire season, it can seem like every single person who works for the Oregon Department of Forestry is out fighting fires.  But somebody has to stay in the offices. 

Count Pete Parsons among them.  He is an ODF meteorologist, keeping track of the weather now and in the future. 

One of his duties is to prepare a seasonal climate forecast, and he just delivered one a matter of days ago.  So we have many questions, including just what we can expect for the rest of the summer and the early fall. 

Oregon Judicial Department

By now women have performed most of the jobs on the planet, so there are few surprises. 

But it was a first when Martha L. Walters took office as Chief Justice of the Oregon Supreme Court

She is the first woman to occupy the position. 

Wikimedia

Even people who understand the stock market and a few things about finance can get overwhelmed by the wealth of information about money. 

Chad Gordon aims to keep people merely whelmed, with a grasp of what they need to know to keep some sense of order to their finances. 

Chad is an investment advisor who channelled what he knows and what he learned into a very accessible book, Wealth by Virtue

Maybe you're pining for fall already, and a break from heat and smoke. 

But we've got long, warm days and maybe even a little time off from work.  That's the reason summer is so conducive to a little extra reading.  Or a lot, if we're lucky. 

Our Summer Reads segment is back for a second summer, visiting with local and locally-owned bookstores to get ideas for good summertime reads. 

Northtown Books in Arcata is the latest independent book store to check in with some items for your reading consideration. 

You can't have a forest fire without an argument about what contributed to the severity of the fire.  Now researchers from the forestry departments at Humboldt State and Oregon State Universities weigh in with research on differences between public and private land. 

In general, the work found that the fire severity is greater on private lands with younger trees, most of the same type. 

Conversely, the fire severity was less on adjacent public lands with greater variety of tree species and age. 

ivanovgood/Pixabay

Creativity is admired and sought-after, if not always appreciated. 

But what does it take to be creative, what makes one person creative and another person less so?  These topics and more will be explored at the first-ever Creativity Conference held at Southern Oregon University, August 3rd through 6th. 

Daniel Deneui, a psychology professor at SOU, is the organizer. 

TeroVesalainen/Pixabay

Not all relationships are created equal.  But most contain some element of power dynamics... one person wielding--or trying to--some power over another person. 

Too bad there's not an owner's manual for relationships. 

There is, though, The Power Manual by Cyndi Suarez, which covers the keys to power and how to use them. 

April Ehrlich/JPR News

Hundreds of Redding residents didn’t have much notice before they heard sirens blaring through their neighborhoods Thursday night, calling for immediate evacuations. People who left were snagged by traffic. If they tried to find a hotel, they were likely out of luck; most were booked solid clear down to Sacramento.

So they ended at an evacuation center, like the one at Shasta College. Cots covered the gym floors, and despite the midday noise, many evacuees slept solidly. They were exhausted. It was hot. And they didn’t know when they could return home, or if their home was left standing.

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