April Ehrlich

Morning Edition Host/Jefferson Exchange Producer

April Ehrlich began freelancing for Jefferson Public Radio in 2016. She officially joined the team as Morning Edition Host and a Jefferson Exchange producer in August 2017.

April previously worked as a reporter covering local government, housing, and the environment in rural Oregon and Idaho. She also served a two-year stint with AmeriCorps, where she worked with nonprofits helping low-income communities in rural Oregon. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in English at Cal-State University, Fullerton, where she worked as an editor for the campus paper.

April spends her free time hiking through nearby forests with a rambunctious border collie or reading fiction at home with her two favorite cats.

By Bundesarchiv, Bild 146-1969-065-24 / CC-BY-SA 3.0, CC BY-SA 3.0 de, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5418804

In our current divided political climate the word "fascist" is an all-purpose insult used by the left to describe members of the alt-right. Much like "socialist" or "liberal" is hurled in the opposite direction.

But what exactly constitutes fascism? In his new book, How Fascism Works, Jason Stanley has a simple formula: fascist politics uses divisiveness to attain power.

He also describes the ten pillars of fascist politics. And he points out that a country need not be fascist to experience fascism. 

Google Street View

That old brick warehouse at the corner of California and Shasta Streets in Redding may look nondescript.  But it's got a bright future, at least if the McConnell Foundation and Shasta Living Streets have anything to say about it. 

And they do... the foundation just gave a grant to Shasta Living Streets to develop uses for the warehouse, now dubbed California Street Labs

nosheep/Pixabay

Discussions of the opioid drug crisis often get well beyond the original reason for using the drugs: pain.  People take Oxycontin and the other opioids, or did at first, because they were suffering with pain. 

But the drugs turned out to be much more addictive than first thought.  The Oregon Health Authority put out guidelines on prescribing opioids for chronic pain two years ago. 

Now a task force is wrapping up work on guidelines for using opioids for acute pain.  

Courtesy VisitRedding.com

The Cascade Theater in Redding was inaugurated in 1935. By the mid-1990s, it was on the verge of collapse.

Pexels/Pixabay

It's become everyday in our age of anxiety. Many of us just don't sleep well, don't sleep enough, or both.

20 percent of Americans suffer from some sort of sleep disorder. Science writer Henry Nicholls comes to this topic from a different personal experience: he sleeps too much. He first noticed symptoms of narcolepsy when he was 21, and his disorder has progressed.

In his latest book, Sleepyhead: The Neuroscience of a Good Night's Rest, Nicholls digs into the latest neurological research on the spectrum of sleep disorders, from insomnia to narcolepsy to sleep apnea to restless leg syndrome, and finds that they have a lot in common. 

change.org

Ocean fishing with large nets always catches creatures besides the intended fish; "bycatch," it's called in the business. 

But some large nets are known for scooping up and killing marine mammals as well as fish.  Driftnets were banned in Washington and Oregon years ago. 

Now California legislators have passed a law to ban driftnet fishing a few years down the road. 

Turtle Island Restoration Network and allied groups are thrilled with the passage. 

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College is necessary, college is expensive.  Both of those things are true for many young people today. 

And making college more accessible is the driving force behind "promise" programs, which offer incentives--like free or reduced tuition--to students who meet certain benchmarks. 

Ben Cannon administers the Oregon Promise program at the Higher Education Coordinating Commission.    

Skitterphoto/Pixabay

Who knew board games could still be a big deal in the age of video and virtual reality?  Jeff DeBoer, for one. 

He turned his love for board, card, and table games into a business model years ago: Funagain Games.  The company runs physical stores in Ashland and Eugene, but sells games both new and old online to customers all over the world. 

Our business segment, The Ground Floor, pays a visit to Jeff DeBoer to learn more about how he got his game business from square one to success. 

Alexis_Fotos via Pixabay

Beer drinkers are living in a very good time.  They have a plethora of choices in colors, flavors, makers, and more. 

The United States has more breweries now than at any time since Prohibition.  But any business that grows this fast is bound to have some growing pains, and John Holl says it certainly does. 

Holl is the author of Drink Beer, Think Beer: Getting to the Bottom of Every Pint.  And that subtitle is a double-entendre; Holl gets to the bottom of the story about beer in our time, illuminating some of the issues in the business and its products. 

socompasshouse.org

The stigma may be lifting from mental illness, but it's a slow lift.  People get help and compassion with a physical infirmity, but often suspicion and fear with a mental health problem. 

Southern Oregon Compass House in Medford brings people who have dealt with mental health issues together in a common clubhouse, for support and resources. 

Once a month we visit with a club member about living with mental illness, and keeping up the recovery. 

truthseeker08/Pixabay

Have you met durian?  You'd probably remember if you did. 

Durian is not a person, but a fruit.  In fact, the King of Fruits, says Lindsay Gasik.  She's a Rogue Valley native now living and working in Thailand and Malaysia, giving tours of the places where durian grow. 

And she blogs about this spiky-looking but tasty fruit, too. 

Anthony Crider, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=61769434

Nationalism is getting a bad name in parts of the world, especially in the United States, where it is often preceded by the world "white." 

Yoram Hazony will not defend that brand of nationalism, but he does see plenty to like in the impulse to defend independent states. 

He lays out the case in his book The Virtue of Nationalism, which sees the alternative a kind of globalist "universalism." 

Non-stop Media: Signals & Noise

Sep 12, 2018

Bob Woodward, of Nixon-era fame, publishes a tell-all about President Donald Trump in his new book. The New York Times publishes its own tell-all in an op-ed written by an anonymous source working near the president. And Nike features an ad with Colin Kaepernick's face overlaid with text that reads: "Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything.”

Sounds like another exciting month in the media business, up for discussion in our media segment, Signals & Noise. 

Our guests, Andrew Gay and Precious Yamaguchi, teach young people about the media at Southern Oregon University

leestilltaolcom/Pixabay

Slavery has long been illegal in the United States, but people are still forced to work and have sex against their will. 

Law enforcement continues to work to crack down on human trafficking, but it's a long haul.  Truckers are keeping their eyes out for people being trafficked; that's the focus of Truckers Against Trafficking

The program comes complete with a training program to make truckers more effective at spotting trafficking. 

Capital Public Radio / File

In an effort to keep illegal marijuana out of the black market, an Oregon state commission has assigned grant funds to help counties beef up patrols. Southern Oregon is getting most of those funds.

A good chunk of the illegal weed pouring out of Oregon is grown in rural areas with underfunded sheriff’s departments, including Josephine and Jackson counties. That’s why lawmakers passed a bill that would open up 1.5 million dollars to counties wanting extra law enforcement.

Skeeze/Pixabay

Fire season clearly still has a while to go, but it's never too early to talk about what happened this year, and why. 

A Smoke and Fire Summit is set for next weekend (Saturday, September 15th) at Southern Oregon University, to help people better understand the contributing factors to a destructive and smoky summer. We hear from Marko Bey of the Lomakatsi Restoration Project, and Don Ferguson, retired from a long career at the federal Bureau of Land Management working on wildland fires.

Meanwhile, the Nature Conservancy recently published a study looking at the history of wildfire behavior in the Rogue River Basin, and will follow it up with a public field trip to look at parts of the forest affected by fire. We hear from its lead author and forest ecologist Kerry Metlen.

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You can find film festivals all over the country now, but few that focus on just films from and about Oregon. 

But that is the mission at the Klamath Independent Film Festival, lighting up screens in Klamath Falls the weekend of September 14-16. 

From features about imperiled horses ("Lean on Pete") to documentaries about the arts scene in the Klamath Basin itself ("Ragland"), there's a bunch to see. 

U.S. Navy photo, Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Jason T. Poplin.

Notice all the colored folders next time you're at the doctor's office; many medical records are still stored on paper. 

But the industry has been pushing for years now toward more computerization, more use of electronic health records (EHR).  It's taking time to convert, but one trend is clear: more IT workers in the health industry. 

William Hersh, MD and teacher of medical informatics at Oregon Health & Science University, tracks the trends in health record adoption. 

Voice of America

The number of women who report being sexually assaulted in America are surprising enough.  But the numbers are shockingly high for Native American women. 

And the shock goes beyond sexual assault to murder and kidnap... these too happen at higher rates for native women than for the rest of the population. 

Southern Oregon Digital Archive

The back-to-the-land movement of the 1970s did a lot to populate the hills and hollers of our region. 

Thalia Truesdell was one of the people who came looking for a simpler way of life... she settled in Sawyer's Bar on the California side, buying some land there. 

Her experiences there and later in the Applegate Valley are the subject of this month's edition of Stories of Southern Oregon, curated by Maureen Flanagan Battistella for the Southern Oregon Digital Archive

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