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At Least 384 Killed, Hundreds Injured After Earthquake And Tsunami Hit Indonesia

Sep 28, 2018

Updated at 4:07 a.m. ET Saturday

At least 384 people were killed and at least 540 injured Friday after powerful earthquakes struck along the western coast of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, triggering a tsunami that caused "extensive" damage.

"When the [tsunami] threat arose yesterday, people were still doing their activities on the beach and did not immediately run and they became victims," Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman for BNPB, Indonesia's disaster response agency, told reporters in Jakarta, Reuters reported.

Dutch authorities have arrested seven men they believe were plotting to carry out a major terrorist attack against "a large event in the Netherlands."

Heavily armed police arrested the suspects in Arnhem, about 60 miles south of the capital, Amsterdam, and Weert, near the Dutch border with Germany and Belgium, the Netherlands Public Prosecution Service said in a statement.

After years in proverbial hip-hop purgatory, Lil Wayne has finally released his long-awaited album Tha Carter V, just after his 36th birthday.

CV, the fifth installment of Wayne's chart-topping, Grammy-winning series that started in 2004, nearly became a pop culture fable about the perils of music industry politics, following years of legal battles with his Cash Money Records boss and musical father figure, Birdman.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh may take a lifetime seat on the Supreme Court as early as next week, but only after shattering a rule about the confirmation process that had been set in stone for decades.

It was the rule that said you stood by your judicial record but held on tight to your judicial temperament. It was understood you had a party affiliation, but it shouldn't be worn on your sleeve. And above all, you were not to antagonize anyone.

You could call this the latest in a list of Capitol Hill norms to be lost in the era of President Trump.

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PolitiFact California looks at claims made by elected officials, candidates and groups and rates them as: True, Mostly True, Half True, Mostly False, False and Pants On Fire.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET

Thanks in part to a flotilla of local boats, all 47 people aboard a Boeing 737 are safe after a crash-landing in a lagoon at the Pacific island of Chuuk.

The Air Niugini plane was on approach to the airport at the island, part of the Federated States of Micronesia, when it apparently fell short of the runway.

Canada's House of Commons voted unanimously Thursday to revoke honorary citizenship for Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi following her failure to halt atrocities against the Southeast Asian country's Rohingya minority.

The vote to strip Suu Kyi of the honor bestowed more than a decade ago came days after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau suggested it might be reconsidered.

What The FBI Does And Doesn't Investigate

Sep 28, 2018

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Don't Hide Money In The Fridge

Sep 28, 2018

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Natasha Rothwell, The Breakout Star Of 'Insecure'

Sep 28, 2018

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Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The American Bar Association said the Senate should not hold a confirmation vote on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court until the FBI investigated sexual assault allegations against him that were made by Christine Blasey Ford and other women.

Across the country, Americans were transfixed Thursday by television coverage of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh as they testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Ford spoke of her allegation that the Supreme Court nominee had sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers in 1982. Kavanaugh vehemently denied it.

How Testimonies From Kavanaugh And Blasey Ford Unfolded Before The Senate

Sep 27, 2018

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The eye-catching scenes of mountain goats flying through the air under helicopters, riding in refrigerated trucks and taking ferries to new homes are done for the year. Roundups and relocations of non-native Olympic National Park goats will resume next year.

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Let's bring in one of the senators who was asking the questions today, Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy. Senator Leahy, welcome.

PATRICK LEAHY: Thank you very much.

State elections officials are considering penalties of nearly $24,000 against campaigns opposing two anti-tax ballot measures this fall, finding the campaigns failed to report financial transactions on time. 

In a letter sent Wednesday, Alma Whalen, a compliance specialist with the Oregon Secretary of State's office, sent notice that the campaign battling Ballot Measure 103 appeared to have reported three transactions later than state law dictates. 

When a wildfire starts, whether by lightning or human hand, it is almost always smothered.

Firefighters and aircraft are dispatched at the first sign of smoke. Ground crews build tight containment lines, contouring where they can with the fire's edge. Helicopters douse hot spots and flames with deluges of foamy water.

The public and media extol their efforts. The headline reads, "Brave firefighters tame destructive fire."

John Kerry: 'It is a dangerous time.'

Sep 27, 2018

John Kerry served as Barack Obama's secretary of state for four years.

Before that, he spent five terms as a US senator. He cataloged all that time in a new memoir, "Every Day Is Extra." 

It's from that long vantage point that Kerry looks at the administration of Donald Trump. Kerry says Trump's tweets are crowding out meaningful discussion of the important issues.  

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In early November, the U.S. will put more sanctions on sales of Iranian oil. Some of Iran's oil customers, such as China, may be undeterred, as NPR's Jackie Northam reports.

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