News

via PBS

Wildfires plague our region every summer, threatening thousands of lives and livelihoods.

So when director Alex Jablonski set out to make a documentary about the lives of firefighters out in the field, he looked to Grants Pass, Oregon.

nosheep/Pixabay

Discussions of the opioid drug crisis often get well beyond the original reason for using the drugs: pain.  People take Oxycontin and the other opioids, or did at first, because they were suffering with pain. 

But the drugs turned out to be much more addictive than first thought.  The Oregon Health Authority put out guidelines on prescribing opioids for chronic pain two years ago. 

Now a task force is wrapping up work on guidelines for using opioids for acute pain.  

Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio
Courtesy VisitRedding.com

The Cascade Theater in Redding was inaugurated in 1935. By the mid-1990s, it was on the verge of collapse.

Lynn Goldsmith

On Friday, September 28th at Noon, JPR will broadcast pianist Lise de la Salle live from the new JPR performance studio.

KAGI Grants Pass Service Alert

Sep 17, 2018

Updated 9-18-2018 9:52 am | KAGI is off the air due to a power outage. Our engineer will restore service as soon as possible.

Our News & Information service in Grants Pass on 930 AM is currently down. Our engineer is travelling to the site today to diagnose the issue.

In the meantime, you can stream us live at ijpr.org.

Thanks for your patience!

AP Photo / Rich Pedroncelli

California officials have made it no secret that for the state to adequately reduce its greenhouse gases, a wholesale change is needed in how we transport ourselves and the goods we consume. Namely, gas-powered cars, trucks and buses must be swapped for their zero-emission counterparts.

Alexis_Fotos via Pixabay

Beer drinkers are living in a very good time.  They have a plethora of choices in colors, flavors, makers, and more. 

The United States has more breweries now than at any time since Prohibition.  But any business that grows this fast is bound to have some growing pains, and John Holl says it certainly does. 

Holl is the author of Drink Beer, Think Beer: Getting to the Bottom of Every Pint.  And that subtitle is a double-entendre; Holl gets to the bottom of the story about beer in our time, illuminating some of the issues in the business and its products. 

River Whyless is a band much like that titular body of water - a mingling of currents, a flow of time and physical space, all brought together in a murmuring sense of purpose. It is the expression of a group of musicians, three of which are songwriters, who have played together in various forms since their college days in the North Carolina mountains.

California Gov. Jerry Brown and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg want the United States to double its current greenhouse-gas emission reductions.

They issued their call on Thursday at Brown’s Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco.

truthseeker08/Pixabay

Have you met durian?  You'd probably remember if you did. 

Durian is not a person, but a fruit.  In fact, the King of Fruits, says Lindsay Gasik.  She's a Rogue Valley native now living and working in Thailand and Malaysia, giving tours of the places where durian grow. 

And she blogs about this spiky-looking but tasty fruit, too. 

inciweb.nwcg.org

UPDATE: FRIDAY, SEPT. 14, 9:30 a.m. -- Cooler, moister weather conditions are giving fire crews the change to make strong progress in containing the Delta fire. It's grown slightly to just over 60,000 acres and is 28 percent contained.

I-5 remains open and traffic is flowing while repairs are being made to guardrails and other infrastructure damaged by the fire.

NOTE: Since this fire seems to be in hand, we will make further updates to this report only if new developments warrant. To follow the daily updates issued by managers on the Delta fire, follow this link.

California Has One Of The Nation's Highest Poverty Rates, Again

Sep 13, 2018
Leroy Skalstad via Pixabay

As housing prices continue to climb in California, experts say measures to bring down those costs, and the continuation of assistance programs such as Medicaid and food assistance, will be crucial for families on the threshold of poverty.

leestilltaolcom/Pixabay

Slavery has long been illegal in the United States, but people are still forced to work and have sex against their will. 

Law enforcement continues to work to crack down on human trafficking, but it's a long haul.  Truckers are keeping their eyes out for people being trafficked; that's the focus of Truckers Against Trafficking

The program comes complete with a training program to make truckers more effective at spotting trafficking. 

Liam Moriarty.JPR News

In late July, the Carr fire swept through parts of Redding, California and the surrounding area. Now, residents are faced with burned hillsides and more than a thousand home sites contaminated with toxic ash. What are the potential environmental impacts? JPR’s Liam Moriarty went to find out.


Capital Public Radio / File

In an effort to keep illegal marijuana out of the black market, an Oregon state commission has assigned grant funds to help counties beef up patrols. Southern Oregon is getting most of those funds.

A good chunk of the illegal weed pouring out of Oregon is grown in rural areas with underfunded sheriff’s departments, including Josephine and Jackson counties. That’s why lawmakers passed a bill that would open up 1.5 million dollars to counties wanting extra law enforcement.

Bradley Parks

Since 2010, one Portland attorney has used public records requests to give his clients a glimpse of upcoming bills in the Oregon Legislature. But this year, lawyer Greg Chaimov says he got something new when he filed his request: A denial.

Emily Cureton/OPB

Josh Horner faced 50 years in prison before an appeals court overturned his conviction this summer. And Monday, the Redmond, Oregon, man got an apology on behalf of the state of Oregon from John Hummel, the Deschutes County district attorney whose office prosecuted Horner on charges of child sex abuse.

As School Year Begins, California Ends Practice That Uprooted Migrant Students

Sep 10, 2018
CALmatters / Byrhonda Lyons

Oscar Ramos teaches students of migrant farm workers in his classroom at Sherwood Elementary School in Salinas, California. He sees students disappear because they must follow the crops with their parents, moving from town to town, making a steady education difficult. One year, a 4th grade teacher started the year with 28 students and ended with just three.

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